Throwback Thursday

25 years ago this month:

  • Adopting the recommendation of the Judicial Qualifi­cations Commission based on a stipulation, the Florida Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for (1) in several cases in which the defendants did not appear, finding the missing defendant guilty and sentencing him or her to credit for time served and (2) in several driving under the influence cases in which a defendants failed to appear, convicting the defendant and ordering forfeiture of the bond without a plea or trial. Inquiry Concerning Colby, 629 So. 2d 120 (Florida 1993).
  • Affirming a joint motion for approval of recommendations based on an agreed statement of facts, the Mississippi Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge and fined him $250 for (1) printing up business cards that identified him on one side as a judge of the Pike County Justice Court and on the other side as “Certified Legal Technician (C.L.T.) Legal Consultation,” and making these cards available at the court office; (2) sending a letter on court stationery to local attorneys advising them that he was available for legal consultation work; (3) appointing as the attorney for indigent criminal defendants in 12 cases an attorney for whom he performed work as a legal consultant without advising the defendant of the relationship although the county attorney was aware of the relationship; (4) presiding over 8 cases in which that attorney represented a party in the proceedings without advising the defendant although the county attorney was aware of the relationship; and (5) his conduct as a certified legal technician in a divorce. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Felder, 629 So. 2d 618 (Mississippi 1993).
  • Accepting the determination of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, the New York Court of Appeals removed a judge for mishandling court funds and failing to recuse himself or disclose the relevant facts in several cases involving an acquaintance from whom the judge had borrowed $500 several years earlier. Murphy v. Commission on Judicial Conduct, 626 N.E.2d 48 (New York 1993).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct removed a judge for failing, as required by statute, to remit court funds and report cases to the state comptroller by the 10th day of the month following collection, to deposit court funds in her official account within 72 hours of receipt, and to maintain adequate records of the receipt of court funds; failing to remit to the state comptroller $550 that she collected; and failing to respond to 3 written inquiries from the Commission. In the Matter of Armbrust, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 16, 1993).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct removed a judge for falsely subscribing that the signature on the petitions to place him on the ballot as the Republican candidate for town justice had been executed in his presence. In the Matter of Heburn, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 16, 1993).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct censured a judge who, from January 1988 through December 1989, failed to deposit court funds in his official account within 72 hours of receipt as required by statute and who cashed 7 personal checks for his relatives and 20 personal checks for himself from cash that he had collected in court. In the Matter of Slomba, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 16, 1993).
  • The North Carolina Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for giving legal advice and counsel to an employee of the county department of social services with regard to her discharge and intervening on her behalf in his official capacity. In re Cornelius, 436 S.E.2d 836 (North Carolina 1993).
  • The Ohio Supreme Court suspended the law license of a former judge for 1 year for 6 acts of unwelcome and offensive sexual remarks and/or physi­cal contact, 5 of which took place while he was either a judge or a judicial candidate. Office of Disciplinary Counsel v. Campbell, 623 N.E.2d 24 (Ohio 1993).
  • The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals publicly censured a magistrate who had been in­volved in his wife’s campaign for circuit judge and had sought disparaging information about her opponent, including contacting the granddaughter of the victim in a murder case handled by the opponent while a prosecuting attorney, facilitating the publishing of advertisements that contained disparaging information about his wife’s opponent, and misrepre­senting who paid for the ads, whose opinion was presented, and who signed them. In the Matter of Codispoti, 438 S.E.2d 549 (West Virginia 1993).

 

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