Throwback Thursday

20 years ago this month:

  • The Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission publicly admonished a judge for driving while intoxicated.  Letter to Munson from the Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission (September 23, 1999).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for banning a case coordinator from her courtroom, her chambers, and the hallway and prohibiting the coordinator from communicating with her or her staff. Inquiry Concerning Brown, Decision and Order Imposing Public Admonishment (California Commission on Judicial Performance September 1, 1999).
  • Approving a stipulation, the Florida Supreme Court publicly reprimanded the judge for inadvertently issuing an order in a case in which his former daughter-in-law was the defendant and his son was the complainant and for executing warrants for the arrest of his former daughter-in-law based on his son’s affidavit.  Inquiry Concerning Brown, 748 So. 2d 960 (Florida 1999).
  • Approving a statement of circumstances and conditional agreement in bar discipline proceedings, the Indiana Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge for failing to recuse from a criminal proceeding against his son and ordering his son’s release from jail following his arrest.  In the Matter of Van Rider, 715 N.E.2d 402 (Indiana 1999).
  • Approving a statement of circumstances and conditional agreement for discipline, the Indiana Supreme Court suspended a judge for 3 days without pay for entering an ex parte temporary restraining order without certification that notice had been given notice to the other side or what efforts had made to give notice or why notice was not required.  In the Matter of Jacobi, 715 N.E.2d 873 (Indiana 1999).
  • Pursuant to an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished who judge had, during a case in which a 16-year-old defendant was charged with disorderly conduct at a high school, referred to the principal as a “b***h” and a teacher as an “a**” and said the teacher “was the same one that my kid had a problem with a couple of years ago.”  In the Matter of Taggart, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct September 15, 1999).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge who, in 52 traffic cases, set bail after the defendants pleaded not guilty during the initial court appearance without inquiring into the factors a statute required a judge to consider and in an amount that matched the subsequent fine and surcharge, using the bail amount to secure payment of the fine and surcharge.  In the Matter of Muskopf, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct September 16, 1999).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge who had failed to disclose to the defendant in a small claims case that he had recently had his car repaired by the plaintiff body shop even though the quality of the repairs to the defendant’s vehicle was an issue in the case and going to the defendant’s home and requesting that she give him a new check made out to the body shop when the defendant made an error in writing a check for the judgement.  In the Matter of Grems, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct September 15, 1999).
  • Pursuant to an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for being a guest of honor with members of his family at a dinner dance that benefited a Catholic schools foundation.  In the Matter of Paris, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct September 16, 1999).
  • Pursuant to an agreed statement of facts, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for making statements about abortion while running for another judicial office.  In the Matter of LaCava, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct September 16, 1999).

 

Throwback Thursday

25 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Supreme Court suspended a judge until the end of her term for signing an order releasing her boyfriend from jail following his arrest on suspicion of domestic violence, criminal trespass, and disorderly conduct after she had called the police.  In re Jett, 882 P.2d 426 (Arizona 1994).
  • Modifying an order of the Judicial Retirement and Removal Commission, the Kentucky Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge for a misrepresentation made in a campaign advertisement and for failing to assess fines, court costs, and DUI service fees as required by statute.  Doyle v. Judicial Retirement and Removal Commission, 885 S.W.2d 917 (Kentucky 1994).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a part-time judge who had become involved as a judge in a matter in his court that involved a current client in a matter in another court, had represented a client in a case that had originated in his court, and had appeared before another part-time lawyer judge of the same county.  In re Sack, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct September 29, 1994).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge who, in 8 incidents over 2 years, acted as a police officer, stopping motorists who were driving improperly and, in most cases, identifying himself as a judge.  In the Matter of Rones, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct September 30, 1994).

Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • Pursuant to a finding allowing for discretionary disclosure, the Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct made public a letter privately warning a judge regarding his web-site and other self-promotional activity. Jayne, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct August 22, 2014).
  • The Hawaii Supreme Court suspended a former judge from the practice of law for 120 days for altering 10 judicial determinations of probable cause documents. In the Matter of DesJardins (Hawaii Supreme Court August 21, 2014).
  • Based on an amended consent-to-discipline agreement, the Ohio Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge based on his arrest and no contest plea to charges of operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol and impeding the roadway. Ohio State Bar Association v. Corrigan, 17 N.E.3d 553 (Ohio 2014).
  • Based on an agreement for discipline by consent, the South Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge who had been convicted on charges that, in return for sexual contact, he gave 2 women money and/or other benefits for the handling and disposition of matters involving them. In the Matter of Ferguson, 762 S.E.2d 385 (South Carolina 2014).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for (1) granting a receiver in a divorce case non-delegable judicial powers and (2) making a disproportionately high percentage of indigent court appointments to 1 attorney, contrary to the Texas Fair Defense Act and the county indigent defense plan; the Commission also ordered the judge to obtain 4 hours of instruction with a mentor judge. Public Admonition of Gonzalez (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2014).

 

Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a former judge for failing, while he was presiding judge, to take sufficient action to ensure that a court commissioner was deciding all of her cases in a timely manner and failing to promptly respond to complaints about the commissioner’s delays. In the Matter Concerning Schnider, Decision and Order (California Commission on Judicial Performance August 31, 2009).
  • Modifying the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Qualifications based on the judge’s consent, the Nebraska Supreme Court suspended a judge for 4 months without pay for (1) improperly involving himself in a criminal case against his nephew by personally requesting the prosecutor to keep a plea agreement open, telephoning and meeting with the nephew’s attorney, and having an ex parte communication with another judge concerning the case; and (2) using expletives during a private conversation with a prosecutor concerning the scheduling of a case, stating that the defendant should have been “hammered” with other felony charges, and leaving a profane and threatening message on the prosecutor’s telephone. In re Complaint against Marcuzzo, 770 N.W.2d 591 (Nebraska 2009).
  • Based on the judge’s acceptance, the North Carolina Judicial Standards Commission publicly reprimanded a judge for ordering a woman to show cause why she should not be held in criminal contempt of court for distributing political flyers alleging the judge was corrupt. Public Reprimand of Bridges (North Carolina Judicial Standards Commission August 24, 2009).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Tennessee Court of the Judiciary publicly reprimanded a judge for taking 8 months to decide a petition to restore custody of a child to the child’s mother. In re Rich (Tennessee Court of the Judiciary August 26, 2009).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for having an affair with a court employee. In the Matter of Mamiya, Stipulation, Agreement, and Order (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 7, 2009).

 

Throwback Thursday

20 years ago this month:

  • Pursuant to a statement of circumstances and conditional agreement for discipline, the Indiana Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for granting a petition for habeas corpus that raised issues of law related to another court’s order even though he knew that the prosecutor had not been notified. In the Matter of Johnson, 715 N.E.2d 370 (Indiana 1999).
  • Affirming the recommendation of the Court of the Judiciary, the Tennessee Supreme Court suspended a part-time non-lawyer judge for (1) using an inmate from the county jail to work on a house being built for the judge’s son; (2) trying a felony offense when he knew or should have known that his court did not have jurisdiction over felony offenses; and (3) falsely answering interrogatories and testifying about his assets in a federal court proceeding in which a judgement had been entered against him. In re Williams, 987 S.W.2d 837 (Tennessee 1998).

 

Throwback Thursday

25 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Supreme Court suspended until the end of his term without pay a judge who had used profane expressions in a case and said “f***ing n***ers” during an in-chambers argument referring to a defendant who had argued that his conviction should be vacated because the state used or failed to use peremptory strikes on the basis of race. In re Goodfarb, 880 P.2d 620 (Arizona 1994).
  • The South Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a magistrate for improperly issuing arrest warrants for uttering fraudulent checks at the request of an individual who was engaged in an illegal loan operation and was essentially using the magistrate to collect on the illegal loans. In the Matter of Ward, 448 S.E.2d 546 (South Carolina 1994).
  • The South Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge, who, while a judge, had, in his capacity as a trustee of an estate, deeded all of the decedent’s interests in certain real property to himself and fraudulently induced the widow to convey her interest in the property to him, mortgaged 2 of the properties and used the loan proceeds for his own use, and submitted a financial accounting to the probate court that had materially false and fraudulent entries. In the Matter of Parker, 437 S.E.2d 37 (South Carolina 1993).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge who was rude to a defendant during a hearing in a case, calling him names such as “smart aleck,” telling him to “shut up before you go to jail,” and lecturing him on being a loser. In re Thronson, Stipulation and agreement and order of admonishment (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 5, 1994).

 

Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • Based on an agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a judicial candidate for “liking” a Facebook post that publicly endorsed a candidate for public office and making a contribution to a political candidate.  In the Matter of Cohen, Agreed order of public reprimand (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission July 21, 2014).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts, the Mississippi Supreme Court removed a former judge and fined her $1,000 for wrongfully incarcerating 8 parents and 3 minors without affording them basic due process rights.  Commission on Judicial Performance v. Darby, 143 So. 3d 564 (Mississippi 2014).
  • Adopting the findings and recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, the New Jersey Supreme Court publicly censured a former judge and permanently barred him from serving in judicial office for (1) engaging in fraudulent conduct including attempts to avoid his judgment creditors, fraudulently transferring real property, breaching his fiduciary duties to investors, having wage garnishments entered against his judicial salaries, failing to report his involvement in litigation as required by an administrative directive, and being consistently uncooperative with opposing counsel in 43 lawsuits filed against him; (2) political contributions by the judge’s law firm and business entities; and (3) the representation of municipal police officers by his law firm while he held judicial office in the county.  In the Matter of Cook, Order (New Jersey Supreme Court July 18, 2014).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for imposing fines and/or surcharges in over 941 cases that exceeded the maximum amounts authorized by law or were below the minimum amounts required by law and failing to properly supervise his court clerks, which resulted in the improper fines in some of the cases.  In the Matter of Piraino, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct July 30, 2014).
  • The Ohio Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to disqualify herself from 53 cases involving a public defender whose arrest for driving while intoxicated she had witnessed, who was temporarily living in her house, and whom she was driving to work.  Disciplinary Counsel v. Oldfield, 16 N.E.3d 581 (Ohio July 2014).
  • The Ohio Supreme Court indefinitely suspended a former judge’s law license based on her conviction on charges of lying to the FBI.  Ohio State Bar Association v. McCafferty, 17 N.E.3d 521 (Ohio July 2014).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a former judge for his extended practice of dismissing citations without a motion from the prosecutor.  Public Reprimand of Romo (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct July 3, 2014).