Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for (1) delays of 320 days, 237 days, and 110 days in deciding 3 matters in less than a year, (2) submitting 11 false salary affidavits, (3) failing as presiding judge to circulate a list of cases under submission, and (4) failing to respond to e-mails inquiring about submitted matters.  In the Matter Concerning Kirihara, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance May 16, 2012).
  • Based on findings by a Board of Examining Officers supported by the judge’s admissions, the Delaware Court on the Judiciary removed a judge from office for advising a young female attorney in an e-mail how to prepare a memorandum in a case before him and hearing cases involving the attorney after developing and expressing romantic feelings for her.  In re Henriksen (Delaware Court on the Judiciary May 3, 2012).
  • The Illinois Courts Commission suspended a judge for 60 days without pay for striking an unattended parked car, then driving his damaged car from the scene at a high rate of speed, disobeying multiple stop signs, causing a 13-year-old girl to move away from the road quickly to avoid being struck, later causing the police to wait when they arrived at his home, and being less than candid before the Commission.  In re Popejoy, Order (Illinois Courts Commission May 9, 2012).
  • Pursuant to a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a former judge for (1) in an adoption proceeding, failing to return a child to the child’s biological parent, failing to recognize the mother’s right to revoke her consent, failing to provide the unrepresented biological parents with adequate information about obtaining counsel, and injecting the father’s immigration status into the matter and (2) displaying an impatient, undignified, and discourteous demeanor in a custody case.  In the Matter of Poyfair, Stipulation, agreement, and order (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 4, 2012).

Throwback Thursday

20 years ago this month:

  • Pursuant to a stipulation for discipline by consent, the California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly censured a former judge for a pattern of improper financial dealings and fiduciary activities, continuing to serve as a trustee of several trusts after becoming a judge, failing to disqualify from cases involving trusts for which he was trustee, and failing to disclose trustee fees, loans, and property interests on his statements of economic interest.  Inquiry Concerning Sullivan, Decision and Order (California Commission on Judicial Performance May 17, 2002).
  • Approving an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge for asking another judge on behalf of a friend to vacate an order of protection he had issued.  In the Matter of Williams, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 17, 2002).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a non-lawyer judge for convicting an unrepresented defendant and imposing a jail sentence after the defendant had pleaded not guilty, without a trial, relying on the defendant’s incriminating statements at arraignment, and without the defendant changing his plea to guilty or waiving his right to a trial.  In the Matter of Hise, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 17, 2002).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge for (1) writing an article for a newsletter in which he attempted to obtain support among local residents for construction of a highway bypass and stating that he had increased the fines on truck drivers to discourage them from using local routes and that he would continue to do so and (2) in 16 cases after accepting guilty pleas, imposing fines that were $20 to $70 in excess of the statutorily authorized maximum fine for the specific convictions.  In the Matter of Reid, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 17, 2002).
  • Pursuant to a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for receiving and considering an ex parte communication from the victim in a criminal case and failing to disclose the communication prior to trial.  In the Matter of Lukevich, Stipulation, Agreement and Order of Admonishment (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 9, 2002).

Throwback Thursday

25 years ago this month:

  • The Arkansas Judicial Discipline and Disability Commission publicly reprimanded a judge for delays in rendering decisions in 13 cases.  In the Matter of King, Final Decision and Order (Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission May 21, 1997).
  • Pursuant to the recommendation of the Judicial Qualifications Commission, the Florida Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for (1) addressing an assistant state attorney as she attempted to state an objection in a raised tone of voice and remarking, for example, “Yeah, you’ll be sorry.  Keep your mouth shut while I’m talking to him,” “Well, there’s no objection required here and if you talk any more it’s an order,” and “You don’t open your mouth anymore until I invite you to do so and if you do I’m gonna hold you in contempt;” and (2) during a second case, berating a second assistant state attorney in an improperly raised voice; refusing to allow the victim to make a statement as was her right, addressing the victim in an improperly raised voice, and acting in an overbearing and dictatorial manner; and having the bailiff physically escort the victim to the rear of the courtroom and making gestures and noises mimicking a shooting gun as she was led away.  Re Wright, 694 So. 2d 734 (Florida 1997).
  • Based on a joint statement of circumstances and conditional agreement, the Indiana Supreme Court suspended a judge for 30 days without pay for failing to disqualify himself from a case in which he had submitted written materials highly critical of the defendant and in support of an attorney against whom the defendant had filed a grievance or to disclose that fact to the defendant; imposing a lengthier sentence on the defendant who demanded a jury trial than he would have imposed if she had submitted to a bench trial or pleaded guilty; and  misrepresenting the law to the defendant and forcing her to choose between proceeding without counsel or exercising her right to counsel and facing contempt and incarceration.  In the Matter of Cox, 680 N.E.2d 528 (Indiana 1997).
  • The Kansas Commission on Judicial Qualifications ordered a judge to cease and desist imposition of a probationary condition that prohibited a juvenile offender from associating with Hispanic males under the age of 21 unless in the company of an adult or unless they were family members.  Inquiry Concerning Robertson, Order (Kansas Commission on Judicial Qualifications May 16, 1997).
  • Accepting the recommendation of the Judiciary Commission, the Louisiana Supreme Court publicly censured a court of appeal judge who had sat as a member of a panel that heard the appeal of a party with whom the judge had a close, personal relationship.  In re Cooks, 694 So. 2d 892 (Louisiana 1997).
  • Agreeing with the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Qualifications, the Nebraska Supreme Court suspended a judge for 6 months without pay for disseminating religious materials to jurors and for offensive and unwelcome conduct that amounted to sexual harassment toward female court personnel, citizens having business in the courts, and student interns  In re Empson, 562 N.W.2d 817 (Nebraska 1997).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for issuing a warrant of eviction based solely on the ex parte request of the landlord, without any notice to the tenant and without conducting any court proceeding.  In the Matter of Holmes, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 29, 1997).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for stating, “Oh, it’s been a rough day — all those blacks in here” and conditioning his disqualification from a case on the withdrawal of complaints against him.  In the Matter of Jensen, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 29, 1997).
  • The Minnesota Board on Judicial Standards publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to enter a decree and judgment on a dissolution case that he had under advisement for more than 11 months, contrary to administrative policies and statute.  Rosas, Press release (Minnesota Board on Judicial Standards May 1997).

Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • A special Alabama Supreme Court affirmed the decision of the Court of the Judiciary suspending the Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court from office without pay for the remainder of his term for entering an administrative order that directed all probate judges to follow Alabama’s marriage laws in disregard of a federal court injunction regarding same-sex marriages; demonstrating an unwillingness to follow clear law; deciding substantive legal issues while purporting to act in his administrative capacity; substituting his judgment for the judgment of the entire Court on a substantive legal issue in a case then pending in the Court; interfering with the legal process and remedies in the U.S. District Court and/or the Alabama Supreme Court; and making a public comment about a pending proceeding and then failing to disqualify from the case.  Moore v Judicial Inquiry Commission 234 So.3d 458 (Alabama 2017).
  • Based on the judge’s agreement, the Arkansas Judicial Discipline and Disability Commission publicly admonished a judge for driving while intoxicated.  Letter of Admonishment of Pearson (Arkansas Judicial Discipline and Disability Commission April 25, 2017).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for violating financial reporting laws during her campaign for office.  In the Matter of Flanagan, Public admonishment (California Commission on Judicial Performance April 11, 2017).
  • Agreeing with an agreement for discipline, the Indiana Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a non-lawyer judge who had been convicted for battery against a public safety official and ordered that he not be eligible for future judicial service; the reprimand was conditioned on the judge tendering his resignation.  In the Matter of Phillips, 72 N.E.3d 917 (Indiana 2017).
  • Pursuant to a former judge’s approval and acceptance, the Kansas Commission on Judicial Qualifications found that, while running for re-election in 2016, the former judge used an out-dated statement by another judge in support of his campaign without obtaining permission and ordered him to desist from providing misleading campaign material.  Inquiry Concerning Henderson, Order (Kansas Commission on Judicial Qualifications April 17, 2017).
  • Based on the judge’s agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a judge for, as a joke, holding an attorney in contempt for adding expungement cases to her docket contrary to a “no add-on” order for the day.  In re Leibson, Agreed order of public reprimand (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission April 13, 2017).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Performance, based on a stipulation of agreed facts and proposed recommendation, the Mississippi Supreme Court suspended a judge from office for 30 days without pay, fined him $1,100, and publicly reprimanded him for threatening to use a weapon on a defendant; interrogating the same defendant concerning his drug use, which had no bearing on the charge before the court; and interrogating, demeaning, and intimidating the defendant’s mother about the defendant’s drug use and her parenting skills.  Commission on Judicial Performance v. Vess, 227 So.3d 952 (Mississippi 2017).
  • Based on the findings of fact, conclusions of law, and recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Performance, the Mississippi Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge and fined him $3,000 for issuing a default judgment that differed in kind and exceeded in amount what was demanded in the complaint.  Commission on Judicial Performance v. Roberts, 227 So.3d 938 (Mississippi 2017).
  • Based on stipulations, the New Hampshire Judicial Conduct Committee publicly reprimanded a judge for revising a negotiated plea agreement sua sponte and refusing to allow the state to strike amendments to the complaints.  In the Matter of DeVries (New Hampshire Judicial Conduct Committee April 7, 2017).

Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for abruptly dismissing a jury when defense counsel had not arrived in the courtroom by 8 a.m. even though he knew the building remained locked; failing to make the defendant and defense counsel aware there was a way to get into the locked courthouse; refusing to allow defense counsel to explain what had happened on the record; and abruptly disqualifying himself and submitting the matter for re-assignment, causing the parties substantial delay and inconvenience.  Chiles, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct April 9, 2012).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission publicly reprimanded a judge for taking action in 2 cases following ex parte communications from the defendants’ parents, 1 of whom was a court employee and 1 of whom was a former client.  Letter of Reprimand (Karren) (Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission April 27, 2012).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission publicly censured a judge for delays in several cases.  Letter of Censure (Keaton) (Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission April 27, 2012).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance severely admonished a judge for (1) making denigrating and undignified comments to litigants and related parties in 5 family law proceedings; (2) inappropriately commenting on complaints made against him and viewing litigants’ web posts about matters pending before him; (3) independently investigating facts in a case; and (4) failing to disclose on the record information that was reasonably relevant to the question of disqualification.  In the Matter of Friedenthal, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance April 3, 2012).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline publicly admonished a judge for his conduct when his former bailiff was charged with domestic violence.  In the Matter of Melville, Finding of fact, conclusions of law, and consent order (Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline April 13, 2012).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Tennessee Court of the Judiciary publicly reprimanded a judge for releasing his son on his own recognizance after his arrest for driving under the influence.  Smith, Letter of reprimand (Tennessee Court of the Judiciary April 2, 2012).

Throwback Thursday

20 years ago this month:

  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge who had pled nolo contendere to a misdemeanor charge of willful or negligent cutting or mutilation of trees growing on public land without permission.  Public Admonishment of McBrien (California Commission on Judicial Performance April 25, 2002).
  • Accepting the recommendation of the Judiciary Commission, the Louisiana Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for making contributions from his excess campaign funds to 7 candidates for public office.  In re Shea, 815 So. 2d 813 (Louisiana 2002).
  • Pursuant to a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for failing to submit a decision for almost 14 months in the judicial review of an administrative decision of the shoreline hearings board.  In re Sheldon, Stipulation, Agreement and Order of Admonishment (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct April 5, 2002).

Throwback Thursday

25 years ago this month:

  • Based on stipulated facts and an agreement, the California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly censured a judge for (1) displaying a crucifix in the courtroom, (2) authorizing the use of his name and title in an advertisement celebrating the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, (3) announcing a policy for sentencing persons convicted of DUI that allowed for no exceptions, and (4) making public statements disparaging other judges and local attorneys.  Inquiry Concerning Velasquez, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance April 16, 1997).
  • Agreeing with the recommendation of the Judicial Qualifications Commission, the Florida Supreme Court removed a judge from office for ordering her clerk to back-date convictions in 47-52 DUI cases to disguise the length of time that she had taken to dispose of the cases.  Inquiry Concerning Johnson, 692 So. 2d 168 (Florida 1997).
  • Acting on a complaint filed by the Judicial Inquiry Board, the Illinois Courts Commission publicly censured the chief justice of the Illinois Supreme Court for, on 4 occasions, failing to cooperate with and disobeying law enforcement officials who had stopped him for violations of traffic laws and volunteering the information that he was a member of the judiciary after being stopped by the officers.  In re Heiple, Order (Illinois Courts Commission April 30, 1997).
  • Accepting the recommendation of the Judiciary Commission, the Louisiana Supreme Court publicly censured a former part-time judge for presiding in 20 criminal cases in which attorneys with whom he was associated in the practice of law represented the defendants and for frequently engaging in financial and business dealings with lawyers likely to come before him.  In re Lemoine, 692 So. 2d 358 (Louisiana 1997).
  • Adopting the decision and recommendation of the Judicial Tenure Commission, the Michigan Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for conducting activities relating to community affairs radio and television programs she produced and hosted during court hours in her chambers; on occasion appropriating the services of court personnel to perform tasks related to the production of the programs during court hours; using the court postage system to circulate correspondence and advertisements related to the programs; using the court’s phone service, voice mail system, fax machine, photocopy machine, and other court materials for the programs; soliciting and receiving funds from a car dealer to sponsor the programs; and failing to report any of the funds received.  In the Matter of Cooley, 563 N.W.2d 645 (Michigan 1997).
  • Pursuant to a joint motion for approval of a recommendation, the Mississippi Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for ex parte conversations with a defendant, the defendant’s mother, the arresting officer, and the prosecutor and his interference with the defendant’s bonding process.  Commission on Judicial Performance v. Vess, 692 So. 2d 80 (Mississippi 1997).
  • The Missouri Supreme Court suspended a judge from office without pay for 30 days for reneging on his agreement with a police chief to drop contempt charges if the police chief released an individual charged with domestic abuse, filing an incomplete and misleading contempt affidavit, and making a public statement regarding a pending case that reflected pre-judgment.  In re Conard, 944 S.W.2d 191 (Missouri 1997).
  • Approving an agreed statement of facts, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for making undignified, discourteous, and disparaging statements while sentencing a citizen of Great Britain who had pled guilty to manslaughter in connection with the death of her infant child.  In re Hanophy, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct April 2, 1997).
  • Pursuant to the recommendation of the Board of Commissioners on Grievances and Discipline, based on a stipulation, the Ohio Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge for making derogatory remarks regarding a litigant’s national origin in one case; ordering marriage as a condition of probation in 3 cases; and displaying a lack of judicial temperament in 4 domestic violence cases.  Office of Disciplinary Counsel v. Mestemaker, 676 N.E.2d 870 (Ohio 1997).
  • The South Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge who had, while a judge, been served with an arrest warrant charging assault and battery of a high and aggravated nature.  In the Matter of Brown, 484 S.E.2d 875 (South Carolina 1997).
  • The West Virginia Judicial Investigation Commission publicly admonished a judge for telling a defendant during his arraignment that, if he wanted appointed counsel his jail time, fine, and costs would be stiffer, and during 2 arraignments, advising the defendants that if they asked for appointed counsel, they could expect the maximum jail time.  In the Matter of Jarrell (West Virginia Judicial Investigation Commission April 21, 1997).

Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • The Florida Supreme Court suspended a judge for 6 months without pay and publicly reprimanded him for (1) while a candidate, (a) falsely stating in a televised debate that he had never been accused of a conflict of interest and failing to correct that statement during the debate or publicly thereafter and (b) stating that he is a registered Republican and that his former affiliation with the Democratic Party was an error; and (2) while an attorney, (a) failing to advise opposing counsel that he was representing the judge presiding in an unrelated case; (b) failing to advise 3 clients of the risks and advantages of common representation and to withdraw when conflicts were apparent; and (c) engaging in representation of one client to the detriment of other clients and incorrectly stating the status of his representation on filings with the bankruptcy court.  Inquiry Concerning Decker, 212 So. 3d 291 (Florida 2017).
  • Based on an agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission suspended a judge without pay for 30 days for (1) granting permanent sole custody of a child without requiring the petitioner to provide evidence or giving the respondent an opportunity to obtain counsel, cross-examine witnesses, or introduce evidence and (2) ordering 2 minor children to be immediately placed in foster care without conducting a formal hearing, taking any sworn testimony, or affording the parents basic due process; the Commission also ordered the judge to complete courses and training on substantive and procedural due process.  In re Stein, Agreed order of suspension (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission March 21, 2017).
  • Based on the findings of a referee following a hearing, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge for (1) dismissing or reducing charges without notice to or the consent of the prosecution; (2) failing to provide a defendant the opportunity to be heard regarding bail; (3) improperly increasing bail; (4) imposing conditions of release on a defendant that were not based in the law; (5) failing to advise a defendant of the right to counsel, asking incriminatory questions, and imposing improper conditions for permitting the defendant to negotiate a plea; and (6) making improper comments about a defendant’s physical appearance.  In the Matter of Clark, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 13, 2017).
  • Accepting an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for making public comments about a pending murder case over which he was presiding in 3 media interviews and, in a post-trial proceeding, being discourteous to the prosecutor.  In the Matter of Piampiano, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 13, 2017).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge for signing his name and judicial title beneath a defendant’s signature on a letter requesting another judge to change a plea for a traffic infraction.  In the Matter of Sullivan, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 13, 2017).
  • As recommended by the Judicial Conduct Commission, the North Dakota Supreme Court suspended a judge for 3 months without pay for a pattern of delay and failing to respond to letters from the presiding judge about the timeliness of decisions; the Court also ordered him to attend the course on decision-making at the National Judicial College.  In the Matter of Hagar, 891 N.W.2d 735 (North Dakota 2017).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to provide the plaintiff in a small claims case with adequate written notice of his trial and proceeding to trial without requiring the defendant to file a written answer; communicating with the defendant regarding the merits of the case; failing to treat the plaintiff with patience, dignity, and courtesy; presenting a settlement offer from the defendant to the plaintiff, and using racially insensitive language while in the courthouse; the Commission also required the judge to complete training for new judges and participate in 1 hour of instruction on racial sensitivity with a mentor to be chosen by the Commission.  Public Reprimand of DeLaPaz and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 17, 2017).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge for refusing to allow a member of the public to inspect and copy case files and physically escorting him out of his office.  Public Warning of Alford and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 28, 2017).
  • The West Virginia Judicial Investigation Commission publicly admonished a former magistrate for (1) wrongly criticizing the pre-trial/bond review program and a circuit court judge while a guest on a radio program, (2) ex parte communications with a public defender, and (3) banning the complainant from the courtroom in retaliation for informing the prosecutor about the magistrate’s ex parte communications with a public defender.  Public Admonishment of Bias (West Virginia Judicial Investigation Commission March 1, 2017).
  • In a de novo review, the Wyoming Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for refusing to perform same-sex marriages and ordered that she either perform no marriage ceremonies or that she perform marriage ceremonies regardless of the couple’s sexual orientation.  Inquiry Concerning Neely, 390 P.3d 728 (Wyoming 2017).

Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for ruling on petitions for intermediate sanctions filed by the probation department regarding a defendant whom he had represented when the defendant was placed on probation in the same criminal matter. Williams, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct March 15, 2012).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts, stipulation, and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge for a series of ex parte communication about an impending sentencing with the defendant’s attorney and the police chief even though a year earlier he had been cautioned by the Commission to avoid ex parte communications. In the Matter of Lamson, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 20, 2012).
  • Adopting the findings and conclusions of the Judicial Standards Commission, which were based on stipulated facts, the North Carolina Supreme Court suspended a judge for 75 days without pay for a practice of (1) dismissing driving-while-license-revoked cases, on her own motion, without hearings, and without authorization of the prosecuting authority and (2) handling misdemeanors and non-alcohol related traffic citations without following normal court procedures and entering favorable dispositions following ex parte communications. In re Hartsfield, 722 S.E.2d 496 (North Carolina 2012).
  • Adopting the findings of the Judicial Standards Commission, the North Carolina Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for signing an order that contained false recitations without reading the order or giving the prosecution notice or an opportunity to make arguments. In re Totten, 722 S.E.2d 783 (North Carolina 2012).
  • Adopting the findings and recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Conduct, to which the judge agreed, the Wyoming Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for comments he made at a city council meeting about towing charges. In the Matter of Lopez, 274 P.3d 405 (Wyoming 2012).

Throwback Thursday

20 years ago this month:

  • Granting a joint motion for approval of a recommendation, the Mississippi Supreme Court suspended a judge for 30 days without pay for (1) signing a perfunctory order appointing his daughter as counsel for an indigent murder suspect at an initial appearance; (2) conducting a bond reduction hearing without notice to the prosecuting attorney and then lowering the bond; and (3) sua sponte setting aside a judgment that he had entered following a civil trial without conducting the statutorily required proceeding and without a showing of good cause.  Commission on Judicial Performance v. Peyton, 812 So. 2d 204 (Mississippi 2002).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for ordering a foster father to paddle his foster child.  Public Reprimand of Kleimann (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 1, 2002).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for sleeping during court proceedings on numerous occasions.  Public Admonition of Kleimann (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 1, 2002).