Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a former judge for, in open court, telling an attorney, in part:  “I remember you . . . I recuse myself from your cases . . . you are the gentleman who yelled at the lady who is now my wife;” stating that the attorney was disrespectful to other women based on rumors he had heard in the community; stating that he was concerned the attorney was a “misogynist;” and brusquely ordering the attorney from his courtroom.  Castillo, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct February 5, 2016).
  • Based on a stipulation for discipline by consent, the California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly censured a judge for (1)(a) failing to make pension payments to his ex-wife for nearly 2 years and deliberately failing to inform her that he was retired and receiving his military pension; (b) making false statements that impugned the integrity of his ex-wife’s former attorney; (c) directing which judge on his court would handle the stipulation and order settling the pension issue with his ex-wife; (2)(a) sending a disparaging, undignified, and discourteous e-mail response to the assistant presiding judge’s inquiry about his availability to help cover the court’s calendar; (b) responding intemperately to the rotation of a particular court reporter to his courtroom; and (3) failing to disqualify himself when a close personal friend appeared as an attorney in cases and failing to disclose the relationship.  Inquiry Concerning Trice (California Commission on Judicial Performance February 4, 2016).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for a pattern of failing to disclose the campaign contributions of attorneys who appeared before him after the election.  In the Matter Concerning Walsh, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance February 10, 2016).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for deliberately engaging a deputy district attorney in an ex parte communication about a case that was pending sentencing before him.  In the Matter of Scott, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance February 17, 2016).
  • Based on the judge’s stipulation and consent, the Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline publicly reprimanded a judge for an ex parte telephone conversation with the deputy district attorney assigned to a criminal case regarding the contested issue of the release of the defendant from jail on his own recognizance and the judge’s disqualification; releasing the defendant on his own recognizance before receiving the deputy district attorney’s motion contesting the release and then disqualifying himself without sufficient reason; and failing to disqualify himself before ruling on the defendant’s release.  In the Matter of Fletcher, Stipulation and order of consent to public reprimand (Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline February 12, 2016).
  • Adopting the findings and recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, which the judge accepted, the New Jersey Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a part-time judge for representing a woman in a divorce proceeding after taking action on mutual harassment complaints filed by her and her husband and while those actions were pending in his court and failing to immediately disqualify himself from harassment complaints after undertaking the representation.  In the Matter of Bowkley, Order (New Jersey Supreme Court February 3, 2016).
  • Granting a petition to accept a stipulation agreement and consent to discipline, the New Mexico Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for permitting and engaging in an impermissible ex parte phone conversation with the plaintiff’s attorney that involved substantive matters in a civil case.  In the Matter of Singleton, Order and public censure (New Mexico Supreme Court February 11, 2016).
  • Adopting findings of fact and misconduct, which the parties had stipulated, the Ohio Supreme Court permanently disbarred a former judge who was convicted in federal court of honest-services mail fraud and conspiracy to commit mail fraud related to his judicial duties.  Disciplinary Counsel v. Terry, 63 N.E.3d 88 (Ohio 2016).
  • Without an opinion, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court affirmed the order of the Court of Judicial Discipline removing a judge from office for not filing state and federal tax returns for 5 years, failing to remit approximately $130 in sales tax owed by a shoe store she owned, opening the shoe store without a license, and pleading guilty to 3 misdemeanors (for dismissing several of her own tickets) and 1 summary offense (the business license violation).  In re Ballentine, 132 A.3d 454 (Pennsylvania 2016), affirming In re Ballentine, Opinion and order (Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline August 4, 2015).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for (1) failing to take immediate steps to disqualify himself and/or transfer his own divorce case out of his court and filing motions in his own court in connection with the pending divorce action and (2) failing to timely rule on or refer the recusal motions filed by the attorney representing his wife in other matters, attempting to intervene in proceedings relating to his own recusal, and displaying a personal animus against the attorney representing his wife; the Commission also ordered the judge to complete 6 additional hours of instruction.  Public Reprimand of Herrera and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct February 24, 2016).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge for entering judgments finding defendants guilty of illegal parking violations that were not supported by a proper complaint or probable cause and imposing fines for these offenses in excess of amounts allowed by law; the Commission also ordered the judge to obtain 10 hours of instruction with a mentor.  Public Warning of Jones and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct February 29, 2016).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a former justice of the peace for dismissing criminal cases without a motion from the prosecutor; frequent and extended absences from the court; delays and confusion caused by his handling of a case; and using court funds for his personal financial benefit.  Public Reprimand of Stringer (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct February 29, 2016).

Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • Accepting a conditional agreement for discipline, the Indiana Supreme Court suspended a judge for 30 days without pay for (1) exhibiting impatience and frustration with a defendant and her attorney and making sarcastic remarks during a bench trial on traffic charges; (2) a practice of imposing substantially higher penalties on infraction litigants who exercised their trial rights; (3) routinely failing to consider the specific circumstances when imposing penalties in traffic cases; and (4) routinely giving general advisements to defendants that understated the state’s burden of proof and frequently speculating to indecisive defendants about what the state’s evidence might be.  In the Matter of Young, 943 N.E.2d 1276 (Indiana 2011).
  • Granting a joint motion for approval of the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Performance, the Mississippi Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for, to determine who was upset about his appointment of the youth public defender and who had released the information to the media, issuing subpoenas to county commissioners without complying with the law.  Commission on Judicial Performance v. Buffington, 55 So. 3d 167 (Mississippi 2011).
  • Based on findings by the Judicial Conduct Board, the Vermont Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to resign as assistant judge upon becoming a candidate for probate judge.  In re Hodgdon, 19 A.3d 598 (Vermont 2011).

Throwback Thursday

20 years ago this month:

  • Accepting a stipulation, the California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly censured a former judge for intentionally altering a court record; the Commission also barred him from receiving any assignment or reference from any California state court.  Inquiry Concerning Judge Hermo, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance February 20, 2001).
  • Accepting the determination of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, the New York Court of Appeals upheld the public censure of a judge for “inappropriate and demeaning” conduct toward his secretary.  In the Matter of Shaw, 747 N.E.2d 1272 (New York 2001).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for (1) in 1 divorce case, finding both parties guilty of contempt and sentencing them to jail, based on the other party’s unsworn statements, without holding a hearing, and instructing the attorneys to submit ex parte affidavits concerning the exchange personal property at the marital residence; (2) in a second case, repeatedly violating the rights of a third-party defendant and conveying an appearance of bias; (3) in a third case, using “colorful” language and exerting pressure in an “injudicious and indiscriminate manner” to force a settlement; and (4) in a fourth case, while exerting pressure to achieve a settlement, stating that the parties were wasting the court’s time on matters that should have been settled, and disparaging the attorneys, in the presence of their clients.  In the Matter of Teresi, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct February 8, 2001).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for, while a candidate for nomination to the supreme court, making improper, inflammatory, taunting, and provocative comments to and about a defendant while presiding over his arraignment for a crime that had resulted in the death of a police officer that conveyed the impression that he was using the judicial proceeding as a political forum.  In the Matter of Brennan, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct February 8, 2001).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for retaining unexpended campaign funds after his unsuccessful campaigns for the nomination to another judicial office rather than returning them to his contributors pro rata.  In the Matter of Mullen, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct February 8, 2001).
  • The New York Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for (1) soliciting and receiving ex parte information about the owner of a mobile home park and relying on the information to the owner’s detriment; and (2) writing a letter on judicial stationery notifying a property owner of code violations and writing to the codes enforcement officer suggesting that he issue an appearance ticket to the property owner’s tenants.  In the Matter of MacLaughlin, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct February 8, 2001).

Throwback Thursday

25 years ago this month:

  • Accepting the recommendation of the Committee on Judicial Conduct, the New Hampshire Supreme Court suspended for 6 months without pay and publicly censured a judge for calling a police officer he knew personally after the officer had ticketed the judge’s brother; the Court conditioned the judge’s reinstatement on his completion of a comprehensive judicial ethics course.  In re Snow, 674 A.2d 573 (New Hampshire 1996).
  • Pursuant to a stipulation, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for appearing on behalf of his sister-in-law at a motion hearing before a family law commissioner during regular court hours and at the courthouse in which he performed his judicial duties; the judge also agreed to attend a judicial ethics course.  In re Chow, Stipulation and Order of Admonishment (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct February 2, 1996).

Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • Based on an agreement and stipulation, the Alabama Court of the Judiciary suspended a judge for 180 days without pay for her handling of her small claims docket.  In the Matter of Pettway, Final judgment (Alabama Court of the Judiciary January 21, 2016).
  • Based on an agreement and stipulation, the Alabama Court of the Judiciary publicly censured a judge for instructing criminal defendants to donate blood or go to jail when they owed court-ordered financial assessments but did not have any money.  In the Matter of Wiggins, Final judgment (Alabama Court of the Judiciary January 21, 2016).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for treating certain women at court inappropriately, despite having been warned by the court about his behavior.  Public Admonishment of Bergeron (California Commission on Judicial Performance January 25, 2016).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for, on 8 occasions, signing and submitting false salary affidavits that stated he had no submitted cases pending and undetermined over 90 days and, on 6 occasions, receiving his salary in violation of the law.  Public Admonishment of Wilson (California Commission on Judicial Performance January 23, 2016).
  • With the judge’s consent, the D.C. Commission on Judicial Disabilities and Tenure released its determination that a judge’s modification of a defendant’s sentence outside the presence of the parties violated the code of judicial conduct.  Re:  Williams, Determination and undertaking (D.C. Commission on Judicial Disabilities and Tenure January 20, 2016).
  • Based on stipulated facts, the Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline removed a former judge from office and ordered him ineligible to hold judicial office in the future following his guilty plea in federal court to 1 count of mail fraud and 1 count of honest services wire fraud, both felonies.  In re Waters, Opinion and order (Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline January 12, 2016).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for disposing of numerous cases in which criminal and juvenile defendants were represented by his wife and entered a cease and desist order in which the judge agreed not to be involved in any cases in which his spouse represents a party.  Re Grimes (Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct January 11, 2016).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for, after taking a case under advisement following a bench trial, entering a written judgment that was inconsistent with the amount of damages sought and presented at trial, failing to provide notice of the entry of the lower judgment amount to the parties, failing to afford the parties an opportunity to be heard on the legal issue that resulted in the lower judgment amount, and failing to announce the final judgment in open court as required by law.  Public Admonition of Contreras (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct January 28, 2016).

Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • Based on a stipulation of facts and waiver of hearing, the Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities released its private reprimand of a judge for officiating the marriage of the victim and the defendant in a domestic violence case and, after dismissing the case based on marital privilege, stating to the defendant, “I earlier today sentenced you to life — marriage to her.”  In the Matter of Russell, Private Reprimand (Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities January 10, 2011).
  • Pursuant an agreement, stipulation of facts, and waiver of hearing, the Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities made public its private reprimand of a judge for driving while intoxicated and being involved in an automobile accident; the judge also agreed to comply with the conditions of a deferred discipline agreement.  In the Matter of Boone, Private Reprimand (Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities January 17, 2011).
  • Affirming the decision of the Commission on Judicial Discipline, the Nevada Supreme Court removed a former judge from office for (1) sleeping during trials; (2) ex parte contacts with deliberating juries in 2 cases, making improper public comments to the media while one of the cases was pending, and making false statements to the media in a post-trial interview; (3) using obscene terms to refer to employees in the presence of her bailiff; giving the bailiff $20 and telling him to “go play with the other bailiffs;” and requiring him to massage her feet, neck, and shoulders; (4) yelling at employees and using foul language in the presence of her assistant; (5) allowing 2 unauthorized individuals to gain access to the courthouse to serve as her body guards or security officers; (6) making false statements to a news reporter; and (7) prohibiting the chief judge from communicating with her except through her attorney, refusing to communicate or cooperate with the court administrator when he attempted to retrieve a rolodex from her office, and telling the police that “unauthorized personnel” were attempting to access her chambers.  In the Matter of Halverson, 373 P.3d 925 (Nevada 2011). 
  • Adopting the findings and recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, the New Jersey Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge for failing to report his consensual, dating relationship with a bailiff he supervised, as required by court policy.  In the Matter of Campbell, 10 A.3d 1201 (New Jersey 2011).
  • Based on an agreed statement of fact and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge for intervening in an impending proceeding involving a hunter who trespassed on his son’s property, asking the investigating department of environmental conservation officer to make the ticket be returnable before him, presiding over the arraignment and accepting the hunter’s guilty plea, and sending his co-judge an ex parte letter about the case.  In the Matter of Allen, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct January 4, 2011).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct removed a non-lawyer judge for failing to deposit and remit court funds in a timely manner, filing reports with the State Comptroller that falsely and/or inaccurately stated the amounts collected, and engaging in impropriety with respect to traffic violations with which she was charged.  In the Matter of Halstead, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct January 27, 2011).
  • The Pennsylvania Supreme Court affirmed the decision of the Court of Judicial Discipline removing a judge for (1) being habitually and egregiously late for court and frequently absent from the courthouse; (2) being impatient, undignified, and discourteous to court staff and hindering and obstructing the administrative responsibilities of other judges and court officials; (3) repeatedly engaging in lengthy recitations of her displeasure with the president judge on the record; (4) causing a commotion outside of a courtroom and, in a letter to the president judge, falsely claiming that a deputy court administrator had caused the incident; (5) ignoring directives of the president judge to report vacation and sick days of her staff, to provide copies of attendance reports for her employees, and to obtain approval for appointments of personnel; (6) consistently handling fewer cases and disposing of cases more slowly than other judges; (7) using a court employee to do personal work; and (8) instructing her law clerk to “cut [the plaintiff’s lawyer] a new as***le” in an opinion and, in a second case, to draft an opinion in favor of the plaintiffs because they had supported her politically and failing to disqualify from those cases.  In re Lokuta, 11 A.3d 427 (Pennsylvania 2011).

Throwback Thursday

20 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Supreme Court removed a judge from office for falling asleep during court proceedings; making inappropriate comments and circulating inappropriate materials, some of which were racist, sexist, or obscene; ex parte communications; failing to recuse and otherwise creating an appearance of bias; inappropriate uses of his judicial position; failing to respect the rights of parties appearing before him; failing to adequately perform his judicial responsibilities; and misrepresenting facts to the Commission on Judicial Conduct.  In the Matter of Carpenter, 17 P.3d 91 (Arizona 2001).
  • The Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission publicly admonished a judge following his conviction for driving while intoxicated.  Letter of Admonition to Jennings (Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission January 23, 2001).
  • The Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission publicly admonished a judge for delay in ruling on a petition for post-trial review filed by an inmate and for failing to properly supervise staff.  Letter of Admonition to Davis (Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission January 26, 2001).
  • Accepting the recommendation of the Judicial Tenure Commission, the Michigan Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for engaging in self-dealing contrary to the interests of his clients when he was an attorney and failing to file a timely answer to the formal complaint.  In re Runco, 620 N.W.2d 844 (Michigan 2001).
  • Based on an agreement, the Minnesota Board on Judicial Standards publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to maintain an impartial demeanor in a case, making undignified and discourteous public references to lawyers serving as public defenders and in other capacities in the case, and publicly commenting on the pending matter.  Public Reprimand of Wolf (Minnesota Board on Judicial Standards January 10, 2001).
  • The New Jersey Supreme Court removed a municipal court judge for (1) signing a letter “JMC” (meaning “judge municipal court”) in a personal dispute regarding payment of his sons’ tuition at a private school; (2) failing to recuse from a case arising from questionable domestic violence complaints filed by a councilman with whom the judge had a close relationship; and (3) filing false accusations against his son’s teacher and then arraigning the teacher.  In the Matter of Samay, 764 A.2d 398 (New Jersey 2001).

Throwback Thursday

25 years ago this month:

  • Based on the recommendation of the Judicial Qualifications Commission, the Florida Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for colliding with a dock while operating a motorboat and leaving the scene without reporting the accident.  Inquiry Concerning Fletcher, 666 So. 2d 137 (Florida 1996).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct removed a judge for failing to remit court funds to the state comptroller by the tenth day of the month following collection as required by state law and failing to cooperate in the Commission’s investigation.  In the Matter of Miller, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct January 19, 1996).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for refusing to appoint an interpreter for a defendant who did not speak English as required by law and making remarks about the defendant and other Spanish-speaking farm workers that gave the appearance of ethnic bias.  In the Matter of Carr, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct January 22, 1996).

Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • Adopting masters’ findings of fact, the California Commission on Judicial Performance removed a judge from office for authoring and showing to his courtroom clerk a “crude and vile” anonymous letter accusing her of infidelity; engaging in a course of conduct over 2 months to convince her to become involved in a closer personal relationship, including giving her money and other gifts; accusing her of extortion to ensure her silence; and providing legal advice to her son.  Inquiry Concerning Saucedo, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance December 1, 2015).
  • The Florida Supreme Court removed a judge from office for threatening to commit violence against an assistant public defender, engaging in a physical altercation with the public defender, and resuming his docket while defendants were without counsel.  Inquiry Concerning Murphy, 181 So. 3d 1169 (Florida 2015).
  • Based on the judge’s agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a judge for his treatment of an investigator for the attorney general’s office during a hearing.  In re Easterling, Order (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission December 18, 2015).
  • With the judge’s consent, the Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities released a private reprimand that states that investigative counsel investigated allegations that the judge had received commissions as a real estate agent involving property included in estates being supervised by the orphans’ court over which she presided.  In the Matter of Phelps, Private reprimand (Maryland Commission on Judicial Disabilities November 6, 2015) .
  • Adopting the findings and recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, the New Jersey Supreme Court suspended a judge without pay for 1 month for 2 incidents of inappropriate touching of a court employee that demeaned, belittled, and publicly humiliated her.  In the Matter of Council, Order (New Jersey Supreme Court December 3, 2015).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a non-lawyer judge for creating the appearance that he was biased in favor of the town in a dangerous dog case by sua sponte sending hearing notices to witnesses whom he speculated would be needed to testify for the town, summarily ending the hearing at the conclusion of the prosecutor’s case, failing to allow the defendant or her witnesses to testify, and deciding in favor of the town without including statutorily-mandated conditions consistent with the ruling.  In the Matter of Heintz, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 17, 2015).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a non-lawyer judge who, while arraigning 2 defendants charged with environmental conservation law violations, listened to a defendant’s “version of the story,” reviewed a map of the alleged trespass site, identified locations on the map, discussed with the defendants whether the locations were public or private, asked the defendants about the events, and listened to their explanations, and failed to set a court date for about 10 months.  In the Matter of Trickler, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 17, 2015).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for driving while under the influence of alcohol and repeatedly asserting his judicial office in connection with his arrest.  In the Matter of Landicino, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 28, 2015).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a chancellor for an order dismissing a complaint for divorce and a counter complaint with language analyzing the U.S. Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage in Obergerfell v. Holdges.  Re Atherton (Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct December 18, 2015).

Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • Based on an agreement, the Arizona Supreme Court publicly censured a judge who, during a settlement conference, said “f*** you” to one of the attorneys while showing his middle finger and told the attorney it was “sh***y” of him to change his position.  Cornelio, Order (Arizona Supreme Court December 9, 2010).
  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to be present or immediately available to promptly attend to court business.  Williams, Amended order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct December 9, 2010).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for inappropriate comments, for example, referring to a tall, thin female attorney with short hair as a “Q-tip.”  Public Admonishment of Gibson (California Commission on Judicial Performance December 14, 2010).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for driving under the influence of alcohol.  Public Admonishment of Widdifield (California Commission on Judicial Performance December 14, 2010).
  • Accepting the recommendation of the Judicial Qualifications Commission based on a stipulation, the Florida Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge and fined her $5,000 for identifying $125,000 on her campaign disclosure form as loans from herself that were, in fact, loans from her father.  Inquiry Concerning Colodny, 51 So.3d 430 (Florida 2010).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for operating a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol, resulting in his conviction for driving while ability impaired, and asserting his judicial office in connection with his arrest.  In the Matter of Maney, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 20, 2010).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for (1) serving as a fiduciary for a close, personal friend and the friend’s daughter and (2) dismissing a DWI case against the friend.  Public Admonition of Fitzgerald (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 16, 2010).
  • The Utah Supreme Court approved the implementation of a public reprimand based on a stipulation of a judge for failing to disqualify himself from 37 traffic citations issued by his son-in-law, the police chief.  In re Adams, Order (Utah Supreme Court December 20, 2010).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for failing to hold mitigation hearings when requested and reducing a person’s fine based solely on review of the citation and the person’s driving record.  In the Matter of Hille, Stipulation, Agreement, and Order (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 3, 2010).