Recent cases

  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for failing to disclose his personal relationship with an attorney every time the attorney appeared before him.  Public Admonishment of Mason (California Commission on Judicial Performance December 3, 2019).
  • Approving a stipulation for discipline by consent, the California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for (1) speaking sharply to a female attorney who was new to the felony trial department and hitting her hand at the bench with enough force to leave a visible impression and (2) using crude and inappropriate language when talking with a court administrator about a case involving sexual misconduct by a judge in another state.  Inquiry Concerning Jacobson, Decision and Order (California Commission on Judicial Performance December 19, 2019).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Discipline based on a stipulation, the Colorado Supreme Court suspended a judge for 28 days without pay and publicly censured him for driving under the influence and crashing his vehicle into trees and bushes while avoiding a collision with another vehicle.  In the Matter of Timbreza (Colorado Supreme Court December 2, 2019).
  • Based on an agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a judge for (1) his handling of a small claims case and (2) holding a hearing in 2 criminal cases even though a petition for his disqualification was pending.  In re Wright, Public reprimand (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission December 23, 2019).
  • Following a hearing, the Nevada Commission Judicial Discipline publicly admonished a hearing master for ignoring an attorney’s objections to her questioning of a juvenile defendant, yelling at the attorney, telling the juvenile that her probation would be increased if she refused to answer her questions, preventing the attorney from making a record on his objection, and threatening to contact the attorney’s boss; the hearing master was also ordered to complete a course at the National Judicial College.  In the Matter of Henry, Findings of fact, conclusions of law, and imposition of discipline (Nevada Commission Judicial Discipline December 12, 2019).
  • Accepting a stipulation based on the judge’s resignation and agreement not to seek or accept judicial office in the future, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct concluded a proceeding against a former non-lawyer judge who waived confidentiality to the limited extent that the stipulation can become public; the Commission had been investigating several complaints alleging that the judge had (1) failed to enforce a town ordinance regulating storage of “junk” on residential properties; (2) failed to properly inform a defendant during an arraignment of his due process rights; and (3) sent a letter to the editor of a local paper in which he made political and partisan statements, criticized public officials and town residents concerning a local controversy; and criticized the governor’s executive decisions and policies and described the governor as “corrupt” at a time when he was running for re-election.  In the Matter of Chamberlain, Decision and order (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 5, 2019).
  • Accepting an agreed statement of facts and recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for (1) using profanity and invoking his judicial office in an attempt to have smoking and/or drug-related paraphernalia removed from a store’s window display and (2) making an insensitive remark about a co-defendant’s ethnicity while acting as a private attorney in a civil case and asserting his judicial office when confronted about his remark.  In the Matter of Tawil, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 12, 2019).
  • Accepting an agreed statement of facts and recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for appearing and acting as his daughter’s attorney in a family court matter on 3 occasions and invoking his judicial title in several instances during 2 court appearances.  In the Matter of Edwards, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 20, 2019).
  • The Oklahoma Supreme Court (1) publicly reprimanded a judge for, while a candidate, violating rules concerning election expenditures and reports and (2) publicly admonished her for neglecting to pay over 60 parking tickets and county, state, and federal tax obligations for several years; the Court also placed her on probation, including completing at least 5 mentoring sessions with an experienced judge.  In the Matter of Coleman (Oklahoma Supreme Court December 3, 2019).
  • The Pennsylvania Judicial Conduct Board issued a letter of counsel to a judge for telling a police officer at a traffic stop to “check the registration on this plate soon;” the Board made the letter public with the judge’s consent.  Letter to Reinaker (Pennsylvania Judicial Conduct Board December 13, 2019).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge for endorsing on his Facebook page his brother’s campaign for a position on the school board.  Public Warning of Saucedo (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 5, 2019).
  • The Utah Supreme Court approved the Judicial Conduct Commission’s reprimand of a judge for texting to court clerks a “short, graphic video showing a man’s scrotum.”  Inquiry Concerning Dow (Utah Supreme Court September 13, 2019).

 

Recent cases

  • Following a hearing on a complaint filed by the Judicial Inquiry Commission, the Alabama Court of the Judiciary publicly reprimanded a judge for initiating and considering ex parte communications with a mother and father about pending child custody and visitation issues.  In the Matter of Wiggins, Final judgment (Alabama Court of the Judiciary November 18, 2019).
  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for, after his dismissal of a civil suit was overturned on appeal, speaking to the plaintiff in a condescending and mocking tone and attempting to dissuade her from exercising her right to a jury trial.  McMurry, Amended order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct November 8, 2019).
  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a special master for proposing that her domestic partner act as a third party neutral in a family law matter without disclosing the relationship.  Paus, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct November 8, 2019).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance removed a judge from office for (1) remanding a defendant into custody without resetting bail in open court and engaging in an ex parte communication with the deputy district attorney about the case; (2) engaging in a pattern of conduct toward a deputy public defender that was unwelcome, undignified, discourteous, and offensive; (3) making unwelcome, undignified, discourteous, and offensive comments to and about other female attorneys who appeared before him; (4) making unwelcome, undignified, discourteous, and offensive comments to his court reporter and female defendants; (5) revoking a criminal defendant’s own recognizance release in the defendant’s absence without affording him or his attorney notice and the opportunity to be heard and creating the appearance that he was retaliating for the filing of a peremptory challenge against him by the defendant’s attorney; and (6) failing to always disclose his son’s employment in the district attorney’s office.  Inquiry Concerning Laettner, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance November 6, 2019).
  • Based on the findings and recommendation of the Judicial Qualifications Commission and a stipulation, the Florida Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for her comments in 2 criminal cases.  Inquiry Concerning Lemonidis (Florida Supreme Court November 14, 2019).  The Court also agreed that the judge should continue to participate in stress management counseling.
  • Following a hearing, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a former judge for intervening on behalf of her ex-husband after he was arrested on several criminal charges including possession of a controlled substance, and texting an ex parte communication to a Commission member just before the hearing.  In re Maze, Findings, conclusions, and final order (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission November 7, 2019).
  • Based on a presentment by the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, the New Jersey Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for a series of aggressive, ex parte emails on New Year’s Eve to a prosecutor about scheduling a trial; a hostile ex parte exchange with the prosecutor in the courtroom; and creating a conflict that required reassignment of the case.  In the Matter of Jones-Tucker, Order (New Jersey Supreme Court November 20, 2019).
  • Based on a petition to accept a stipulation to permanent resignation from judicial office in lieu of further proceedings, the New Mexico Supreme Court ordered a former judge to never again hold or become a candidate for any judicial office in New Mexico; the Judicial Standards Commission had filed a notice of formal proceedings, which the judge contested, alleging that the judge had violated defendants’ due process rights; failed to follow the law and court procedures regarding contempt, warrants, bond, and conditions of release; and engaged in ex parte communications.  In the Matter of Harrison, Order (New Mexico Supreme Court November 5, 2019).
  • Based on findings of misconduct, the Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline suspended a judge for 45 days without pay and fined him $5,000 for (1) viewing images of naked and partially naked women while in his office and (2) having judicial employees grade papers and make copies of handouts on the court’s copier for classes he was teaching.  In re Muth, Opinion and order (Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline November 8, 2019).  The Court also placed him on probation for 1 year, conditioned on his undergoing “a psychological and psychosocial assessment by a licensed psychologist to determine the cognitive, behavioral, and emotional motivation leading to the inappropriate sexualized behavior” and completing any recommended treatment recommendations.
  • Based on an agreement, the Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for sharing partisan posts on Facebook on issues such as the credibility of federal agencies; professional athletes kneeling during the national anthem; the effect of undocumented immigrants on the economy; the Democratic party platform; support for or opposition to presidential candidates; the Black Lives Matter movement; media bias; fatal shootings by police officers; anti-Jihadist sentiment; transgender bathrooms and boys in girls’ locker rooms; and undocumented immigrants voting in Virginia.  Lammey (Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct November 15, 2019).  The judge also agreed to complete a program addressing ethical issues and social media; to refrain from making comments or disseminating posts substantially similar to those that were the subject of the reprimand; and to keep his social media platforms “private.”
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge for refusing to perform same-sex weddings while continuing to perform opposite-sex weddings.  Public Warning of Hensley (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct November 12, 2019).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge for his comments to a newspaper reporter and in a letter to the editor about young black defendants.  Public Warning of McSpadden (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct November 12, 2019).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for, without notice or a reasonable evidentiary basis, entering an order in a case to which he was not assigned that gratuitously attacked the character of 2 attorneys.  In re Spanner, Stipulation, agreement, and order (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct November 22, 2019).  The judge also agreed to participate in 4 hours of judicial ethics training.

Recent cases

  • Following a hearing on a complaint filed by the Judicial Inquiry Board, the Illinois Courts Commission removed a judge from office for (1) making false and misleading statements to detectives investigating the discharge of a firearm in his apartment; (2) retaliating against 2 employees who filed sexual harassment allegations against him; and (3) during the disciplinary proceedings, providing testimony that contained misrepresentations, omissions, and deceptions.  In re O’Shea, Order (Illinois Courts Commission September 27, 2019).
  • Accepting an agreed statement of facts and recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for presiding over more than 2,500 civil matters involving a credit union for which his brother was an officer and board member.  In the Matter of DiMillo, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 1, 2019).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct removed a part-time judge for, in a series of emails to his clients in a family court matter, repeatedly denigrating in profane, vulgar, and sexist terms his clients’ daughter and her former husband, opposing counsel, the referee in the case, and school officials.  In the Matter of Senzer, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 9, 2019). The judge has requested review.
  • Based on a stipulation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge who, during a civil trial, threatened to file a professional grievance against the defendant’s attorney for making an offensive remark during his summation unless his client immediately offered to settle the case for $25,000.  In the Matter of Edwards, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 23, 2019).
  • Agreeing with the findings and recommendation of the Board of Professional Conduct, the Ohio Supreme Court indefinitely suspended a former judge from the practice of law for (1) sexual misconduct, including sexually harassing his secretary and an intern; (2) misusing county resources and staff in his campaign for the court of appeals; and (3) his guilty plea to misdemeanor charges of failing to file accurate campaign statements.  Disciplinary Counsel v. Horton (Ohio Supreme Court October 10, 2019)
  • The Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline publicly reprimanded a former judge for (1) his conduct toward court clerks, including violations of the court policy prohibiting harassment in the workplace; (2) his demeanor towards lawyers, litigants, and police officers; (3) his treatment of 2 constables; and (4) his conduct toward witnesses for the Judicial Conduct Board.  In re Hladio, Opinion (March 25, 2019), Opinion (Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline October 4, 2019).
  • Based on a stipulated record, the Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline publicly reprimanded a judge for, during his re-election campaign, publicly confronting 3 people who supported his opponent and yelling at them, insulting them, and threatening them; the Court also placed him on probation for 1 year with the condition that he submit to a psychological assessment.  In re Maruszczak, Opinion (January 9, 2019), Opinion (Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline October 4, 2019).
  • Agreeing with the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, a Texas Special Court of Review publicly admonished a judge for authorizing the use of his name, title, and likeness on materials supporting a candidate for director of an electric cooperative.  In re Oakley, Opinion (Texas Special Court of Review October 25, 2019).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for failing for 15 months to enter an order on competing motions to confirm or vacate an arbitration award, communicating ex parte with counsel and then temporarily staying a valid writ of execution based on concerns about its execution during a doctor’s office hours, and failing to respond to a letter of inquiry from the Commission.  Public Reprimand of Slaughter (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 11, 2019).

 

Recent cases

  • Accepting a stipulation based on the judge’s resignation following a formal complaint and his agreement not to seek or accept judicial office in the future, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct concluded a proceeding against a former judge, who waived confidentiality to the limited extent that the stipulation can become public; the complaint alleged that the judge had posted on his Facebook account “a picture of a noose with the annotation, ‘IF WE WANT TO MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN WE WILL HAVE TO MAKE EVIL PEOPLE FEAR PUNISHMENT AGAIN,’” and the stipulation stated that the judge had “shared an image and statement on his Facebook account that was visible to the public and conveyed and/or appeared to convey racial and/or political bias, and thereby failed to act in a manner that promotes public confidence in the integrity and impartiality of the judiciary.”  In the Matter of Canning, Decision and Order (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct September 12, 2019).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement for stated disposition, the North Carolina Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for, in a hearing to determine whether a mother should be held in contempt after her 15-year-old twin sons refused to visit with their father, directing the bailiff to handcuff the mother and escort her out of the courtroom without an opportunity to be heard and without any contemptuous behavior in the courtroom and berating and threatening the children.  In re Foster, Order (North Carolina Supreme Court September 27, 2019).
  • Based on stipulated facts and conclusions of law, the Vermont Judicial Conduct Board publicly reprimanded a former judge for failing in a probate case to complete all hearings as noticed, to follow-up and enforce orders, or to hold the guardian accountable and failing to hear and decide motions for months or longer without justification.  In re Lewis, Public reprimand (Vermont Judicial Conduct Board September 6, 2019).
  • Adopting the conclusions of a special committee, the 10th Circuit Judicial Council publicly reprimanded and admonished a U.S. District Judge for the District of Kansas for (1) giving preferential treatment and unwanted attention to female court employees in the form of sexually suggestive comments, inappropriate text messages, and excessive, non-work-related contact, often after work hours and late at night; (2) engaging in a years-long extramarital sexual relationship with a drug-using individual who was then on probation for state-court felony convictions and is now incarcerated for probation violations; and (3) being habitually late for court proceedings and meetings for years.  In re:  Complaint under the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act (Murguia), Order (10th Circuit Judicial Council September 30, 2019).

Recent cases

  • The Alabama Court of the Judiciary accepted an agreement and stipulation in which a former judge agreed to never again seek judicial office in the state and to pay over $2300 in costs and the Judicial Investigation Commission agreed to dismiss 1 count of its complaint against him; the parties stipulated that, while he was involved in a romantic relationship with an attorney, the judge had (1) appointed the attorney to cases, taken judicial action in cases in which she was attorney of record, and entered attorney’s fees declaration orders for her benefit and (2) gained access to courtroom surveillance footage to advance their private interests.  In the Matter of Kaminski, Final judgment (Alabama Court of the Judiciary August 6, 2019).
  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a former judge for dereliction of duty based on an operational review conducted by the Administrative Office of the Courts, which referred the matter to the Commission.  Martinez, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct August 13, 2019).
  • The investigative panel of the Georgia Judicial Qualifications Commission reported that its investigation of a magistrate who was under criminal investigation for a crime of moral turpitude had been disposed of with his resignation.  In re Hrabovsky, Report of disposition (Georgia Judicial Qualifications Commission July 17, 2019).
  • Accepting a stipulation based on the judge’s resignation and agreement not to seek or accept judicial office in the future, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct concluded a proceeding against a former judge; a formal complaint alleged that the judge had signed an arrest warrant for a husband and a stay-away order of protection on behalf of a wife even though the judge was representing the wife in a divorce action and had assisted the wife file a family offense petition against the husband based on the same incident and then continued to represent the wife for almost a year after signing the warrant and the order of protection in the related criminal case.  In the Matter of Katz, Decision and Order (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 9, 2019).
  • Accepting the findings of fact and conclusions of law of the Board of Professional Conduct, which were based on stipulations of fact, misconduct, and aggravating and mitigating factors, and agreeing with its recommended sanction, the Ohio Supreme Court suspended a former judge’s license to practice law for 1 year, with 6 months stayed and credit for time served under an interim suspension, for (1) his conviction on crimes related to his failure to disclose on his annual financial disclosure statements his ownership interest in an LLC that owned an office building; (2) failing to disqualify himself from cases in which several tenants in the office building appeared as counsel; (3) making derogatory statements about proposed legislation and its sponsors in a letter on official court stationery to state representatives; (4) making improper comments from the bench; (5) talking ex parte to a defendant after he had pleaded guilty; (6) refusing to apply controlling precedent in a criminal trial; and (7) conducting a hearing in Spanish rather than appointing an interpreter.  Disciplinary Counsel v. Burge (Ohio Supreme Court August 13, 2019).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for closing his courtroom and draping black fabric over the door to protest the confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.  Public Admonition of Lipscombe (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 8, 2019).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge for refusing to allow a litigant to review and copy the charging documents in his case until he entered a plea and for her policy and practice regarding access to court’s files; the Commission also ordered the judge to receive 2 hours of instruction with a mentor.  Public Warning of Baggett and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 8, 2019).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for invoking her judicial position during a telephone conversation with a man she believed was the estranged husband of a woman she believed was cohabitating with her estranged husband; the Commission also ordered that she receive 2 hours of instruction with a mentor.  Public Admonition of Rocha and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a former judge for telling a woman that she should wait to file her complaint until he had an opportunity to discuss the case with the defendant, whom he knew, and failing to timely issue a citation.  Public Admonition of Crouch (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 8, 2019).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished 11 judges or former judges from the same district court for instructing hearing officers not to issue personal recognizance bonds in any cases and to strictly follow a bail schedule, contrary to the authority provided to the hearing officers by statute; the judges reportedly will request review.  Public Admonition of Barr (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of Ritchie (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of McSpadden (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of Brown (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of Cabaniss (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of Collins (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of Ellis (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of Evans (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of Jones (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of Powell (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019); Public Admonition of Wallace (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 26, 2019).
  • Pursuant to a stipulation, the Vermont Judicial Conduct Board publicly reprimanded a judge for directly asking attorneys, including attorneys who appeared before him, to be part of his campaign committee; the judge also agreed to participate in a mentoring program.  In re Glennon, Public reprimand with order (Vermont Judicial Conduct Board August 28, 2019).

 

 

Recent cases

  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for failing to timely act in 3 family law cases and signing 2 false salary affidavits.  In the Matter Concerning Lamb, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance July 2, 2019).
  • Based on stipulated facts, the Mississippi Supreme Court suspended a judge for 30 days without pay, publicly reprimanded him, and fined him $500 for contacting sheriff’s investigators in 2 cases and remanding the charge to file in 1 of the cases.  Commission on Judicial Performance v. Sutton (Mississippi Supreme Court July 19, 2019).
  • Based on a stipulation, the Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline publicly reprimanded a judge for ordering a landlord jailed for contempt without following the law; the judge also agreed to complete a course at the National Judicial College.  In the Matter of Jasperson, Stipulation and order of consent (Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline July 23, 2019).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge for failing for over 15 months to appoint a prosecutor pro tem for or recuse himself from a criminal matter against a justice of the peace who was his friend and with whom he had a business relationship.  Public Warning of Turcotte (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct July 16, 2019).\
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge for failing to maintain her Texas law license in good standing 5 times from 1992 through 2018.  Public Warning of Guaderrama (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct July 16, 2019).
  • Based on the findings and recommendation of a judicial conduct panel, the Wisconsin Supreme Court suspended a former judge for 3 years from eligibility for appointment as a reserve municipal court judge for a “pattern of obsessive conduct about whether [the court manager] liked him as a friend” and actions that were meant to intimidate her or to retaliate against her for reporting his conduct.  Judicial Commission v. Kachinsky (Wisconsin Supreme Court July 9, 2019).
  • Based on a special committee report, the Judicial Council of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit publicly admonished a judge for his practice of ex parte communications with the U.S. Attorney’s Office; the Council also ordered that the judge remain unassigned to any matters involving U.S. Attorney’s Office until September 1, watch a Federal Judicial Center training video, and read the excerpts of the Code of Conduct that are part of the training.  In re Bruce, Memorandum (7th Circuit Judicial Council May 14, 2019).

 

Recent cases

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for entering an ex parte order in a criminal matter from which he had recused himself.  Jantzen, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct May 13, 2019).
  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for, during a drug court hearing, saying, “sit on my lap if you want . . . no, no I take that back” to a female participant when she seemed confused about where to sit or stand when her case was called.  Fell, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct June 10, 2019).
  • Based on a joint statement of circumstances and conditional agreement for discipline, the Indiana Supreme Court suspended a judge without pay for 45 days for appointing an unqualified friend as trustee of a trust and personal representative of a related estate, failing to disclose the friendship and his financial relationship with the friend, and failing to respond promptly to evidence his friend was embezzling the funds.  In the Matter of Freese, Per curiam opinion (Indiana Supreme Court June 4, 2019).
  • Based on the findings, conclusions, and recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Disabilities, the Maryland Court of Appeals suspended a judge for 6 months without pay for (1) abdicating her duty to handle and process search warrant materials, as required by statute, and instructing a law clerk to destroy warrant materials and (2) failing to treat fellow judges and courthouse staff with dignity and respect, including repeatedly yelling at court clerks and judges, subjecting court clerks to line-ups when clerical mistakes were made, physically pushing a clerk, and repeatedly attempting to undermine the authority of the administrative judge.  In the Matter of Russell, Opinion (Maryland Court of Appeals June 28, 2019).  The Court conditioned the judge’s reinstatement on her undergoing emotional and behavioral assessment by a health care professional and completion of an approved course on judicial ethics.
  • Adopting the findings of fact and conclusions of law of the Judicial Tenure Commission, the Michigan Supreme Court removed a judge from office for (1) failing to disclose the extent of her relationship with a police detective who was a witness in a trial over which she presided; (2) failing to disclose the extent of her relationship with an attorney when the attorney or her law firm appeared in several cases over which the judge presided; (3) failing to immediately disqualify herself from her own divorce proceeding and destroying evidence; (4) making false statements (a) during court proceedings over which she presided, (b) to the Commission while under oath, and (c) while testifying at her deposition under oath in her divorce proceeding; (5) being persistently impatient, undignified, and discourteous to those appearing before her; (6) requiring her staff to perform personal tasks during work hours; (7) allowing her staff to work on her judicial campaign during work hours; and (8) improperly interrupting 2 depositions that she attended during her divorce proceeding; the Court also barred her from exercising the power of her office for 6 years without pay if she were to be elected or appointed to judicial office during that time.  In re Brennan (Michigan Supreme Court June 19, 2019).
  • Adopting the findings and recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, based on stipulations, the New Jersey Supreme Court publicly censured a former judge for directing that money from a municipal DWI fund be disbursed to him without the required pre-approval from his assignment judge; the Court also permanently barred him from judicial office and ordered that he pay restitution of $11,995.85 to the state.  In the Matter of Corradino (New Jersey Supreme Court June 5, 2019).
  • Based on the judge’s resignation and agreement to be disqualified from judicial service in the state, the Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct agreed not to pursue further disciplinary proceedings against a former judge; the Commission had received 2 complaints alleging that the judge had sexually harassed a woman and/or engaged in a sexual relationship with a woman employed by the county, which the judge denied.  Sutherland, Voluntary agreement to resign from judicial office in lieu of disciplinary action (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct June 6, 2019).
  • Based on a formal complaint, to which the judge stipulated, the Vermont Judicial Conduct Board publicly reprimanded a judge for, in small claims cases, issuing arrest warrants for judgment debtors without due process, financial disclosure hearings, or contempt hearings; setting “purge amounts” on the arrest warrants without a finding about the judgment debtor’s ability to pay; and continuing financial disclosure hearings on a rolling, on-going basis even after a judgment debtor’s present inability to pay had been demonstrated by sufficient evidence.  In re Vance, Public reprimand with order (Vermont Judicial Conduct Board May 28, 2019).