Recent cases

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for multiple errors in an eviction proceeding. Carrillo, Order (February 6, 2017).
  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for, while a candidate, (1) obtaining and registering the domain name he knew his opponent intended to use for his campaign web-site and redirecting internet traffic from that web-site to his campaign web-site and (2) having a small image on his Facebook page with a logo that stated, “Andrew Hettinger Justice of the Peace” without “elect” prior to his name or “for” between his name and the position. Hettinger, Amended order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct May 31, 2017).
  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a pro tem judge for promoting the use of a company in which she has an ownership interest while presiding over settlement discussions in a family law case and including use of that company’s service as a term in the settlement agreement.  Sheldon, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct May 17, 2017).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for (1) posting a statement about a judicial candidate on Facebook with knowing or reckless disregard for the truth and (2) being Facebook friends with attorneys who were appearing regularly before him. In the Matter Concerning Ferguson, Public admonishment (California Commission on Judicial Performance May 31, 2017).
  • Approving the recommendation of the hearing panel of the Judicial Qualifications Commission, the Florida Supreme Court suspended a judge for 90 days without pay and publicly reprimanded her for knowingly misrepresenting a newspaper endorsement for her 1994 legislative re-election campaign to make it appear the endorsement was for her 2014 judicial campaign. Inquiry Concerning Shepard (Florida Supreme Court May 4, 2017).
  • Based on stipulations, the New Hampshire Judicial Conduct Committee publicly reprimanded a judge for revising a negotiated plea agreement sua sponte and refusing to allow the state to strike amendments to the charges; the Committee dismissed complaints about the judge’s handling of 4 other plea agreements with a caution and recommendation for prudent future conduct. In the Matter of DeVries (New Hampshire Judicial Conduct Committee April 7, 2017).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct removed a non-lawyer judge for (1) multiple efforts to influence the disposition of a traffic ticket received by his daughter and being discourteous to the prosecutor in the case and (2) in connection with the appeal of his order of restitution in a case, sending 8 letter to the county court that contained factual and legal arguments and biased, discourteous statements about the defendant and his attorney. In the Matter of Ayres, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 4, 2017), review requested.
  • Adopting the findings and conclusions of the Judicial Standards Commission based on stipulations and accepting its recommendation based on the judge’s agreement, the North Carolina Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for driving while substantially impaired and belligerent, offensive, and denigrating behavior towards law enforcement and emergency personnel. In re LaBarre (North Carolina Supreme Court May 5, 2017).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Board of Professional Conduct based on stipulations, the Ohio Supreme Court suspended a former judge from the practice of law for 2 years, with the second year stayed on the condition that he commit no further misconduct, for soliciting prostitution and falsifying a court record. Ohio State Bar Association v. Jacob (Ohio Supreme Court May 10, 2017).
  • Accepting an agreement for discipline by consent, the South Carolina Supreme Court suspended for 45 days without pay a judge who had a physical altercation with another attendee following a meeting of a cotillion club. In the Matter of Johnson (South Carolina Supreme Court May 31, 2017).
  • Affirming the determination of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, the Special Court of Review Appointed by the Texas Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for engaging in an improper sexual relationship with his chief clerk. In re Casey (Special Court of Review Appointed by the Texas Supreme Court May 9, 2017).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for a Facebook post that stated, “Time for a tree and a rope . . .” in response to the arrest of an African-American man for the killing of a police officer. Amended Public Reprimand and Order of Additional Education of Oakley (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 8, 2017).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge for refusing to allow a member of the public to inspect and copy judicial case files and physically escorting the man out of his office. Public Warning of Alford and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 28, 2017).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to provide the plaintiff in a small claims case with adequate written notice of his trial date, proceeding to trial without requiring the defendant to file a written answer to the lawsuit, communicating with the defendant regarding the merits of the case, failing to treat the plaintiff with patience, dignity, and courtesy, presenting a settlement offer in a way that give the plaintiff the impression the defendant was in a position to influence the judge and used the prestige of his office to advance the defendant’s interest, and using racially insensitive language while in the courthouse. Public Reprimand of DeLaPaz and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 17, 2017).
  • Adopting the decision of the Judicial Conduct Board, the Vermont Supreme Court ordered that a judge be immediately and permanently suspended from judicial office, prohibited him from holding judicial office in the state, and publicly reprimanded him for depositing payments on loans into his personal bank account even though the loans had been made with funds from his uncle’s wife and negotiating the forgiveness of the loans; making a facially implausible claim against her estate; failing to protect the assets of the estate; and making false statements during a probate court hearing. In re Kane (Vermont Supreme Court May 24,  2017).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge who solicited endorsements from court employees in support of his campaign. In re Federspiel, Stipulation, Agreement, and Order of Reprimand (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct May 12, 2017).

Recent cases

  • A special Alabama Supreme Court affirmed the decision of the Court of the Judiciary suspending the chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court from office without pay for the remainder of his term for entering an administrative order that directed all probate judges to follow the state’s marriage laws in disregard of a federal court injunction and for failing to disqualify himself from the state case on same-sex marriage after taking a position on the issue in the administrative order. Moore v Judicial Inquiry Commission (Alabama Supreme Court April 19, 2017).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for violations of the financial reporting laws during her campaign for office. In the Matter of Flanagan, Public admonishment (California Commission on Judicial Performance April 11, 2017).
  • Agreeing with a statement of circumstances and conditional agreement for discipline, the Indiana Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a non-lawyer judge who had been convicted of battery against a public safety official for shoving the police chief during a meeting and ordered that he be eligible for future judicial service and that he pay the costs of the proceeding; the reprimand was conditioned on the judge tendering his resignation effective April 28, 2017. In the Matter of Phillips (Indiana Supreme court April 28, 2017).
  • Agreeing with the findings of a hearing panel of the Commission on Judicial Qualifications, the Kansas Supreme Court found that a former judge made dishonest statements under oath in a prior discipline proceeding; however, it did not impose a sanction because the judge had resigned, and suspension or removal were, therefore, unavailable. In the Matter of Henderson (Kansas Supreme Court April 7, 2017).
  • Based on the judge’s agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a judge for, as a joke, holding an attorney in contempt for adding expungement cases to her docket contrary to a “no add-on” order for the day. In re Leibson, Agreed order of public reprimand (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission April 13, 2017).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Performance, based on a stipulation of agreed facts and proposed recommendation, the Mississippi Supreme Court suspended a judge from office for 30 days without pay, fined him $1,100, and publicly reprimanded him for threatening to use a weapon on a defendant, interrogating the same defendant concerning his drug use, which had no bearing on the charge before the court, and interrogating, demeaning, and intimidating the defendant’s mother about the defendant’s drug use and her parenting skills. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Vess (Mississippi Supreme Court April 20, 2017).
  • Based on the findings of fact, conclusions of law, and recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Performance, the Mississippi Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge and fined him $3,000 for advising a plaintiff to orally move to amend her complaint and issuing a default judgment that ordered an immediate eviction even though the original complaint had not asked for it, and that awarded $3,000 more than the original complaint had demanded. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Roberts (Mississippi Supreme Court April 20, 2017).

 

Recent cases

  • Based on an agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission suspended a judge without pay for 30 days for (1) granting permanent sole custody of a child to a petitioner without requiring the petitioner to provide evidence or giving the respondent an opportunity to obtain counsel, cross-examine witnesses, or introduce evidence and (2) ordering 2 minor children to be immediately placed in foster care without conducting a formal hearing, taking sworn testimony, or affording the parents basic due process. In re Stein, Agreed order of suspension (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission March 21, 2017).  In September 2016, based on an agreement, the Commission had suspended the same judge for 7 days without pay for granting an ex parte motion to grant immediate custody to a child’s father.
  • Based on the findings of a referee following a hearing, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct censured a non-lawyer judge for (1) dismissing or reducing charges without notice to or the consent of the prosecution; (2) failing to provide a defendant the opportunity to be heard regarding bail; (3) increasing bail in an improper manner; (4) imposing conditions of release on a defendant that were without basis in law; (5) failing to advise a defendant of the right to counsel, asking incriminatory questions, and imposing improper conditions for permitting the defendant to negotiate a plea; and (6) making improper comments about a defendant’s physical appearance. In the Matter of Clark, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 13, 2017).
  • Accepting an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct censured a judge for making prohibited public comments in 3 media interviews about a pending murder case and threatening to have a prosecutor handcuffed and jailed during a post-trial proceeding in the same case. In the Matter of Piampiano, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 13, 2017).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct censured a non-lawyer judge for signing his name and judicial title beneath a defendant’s signature on a letter requesting another court to change the defendant’s plea from not guilty to guilty regarding a traffic infraction. In the Matter of Sullivan, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 13, 2017).
  • Accepting a stipulation based on the judge’s agreement to resign and never seek or accept judicial office, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct discontinued a proceeding against a non-lawyer judge. In the Matter of Purtell, Decision and order (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 15, 2017).  The Commission had served a formal written complaint on the judge alleging that he had failed to follow the law in 3 arraignments, including failing to adequately advise the defendants of their constitutional rights and conditioning the duration of defendants’ incarceration on payment of fines and surcharges and made undignified and/or discourteous comments from the bench about women.  The Commission had subsequently apprised him that it was also investigating a complaint regarding his handling of another arraignment.
  • The North Dakota Supreme Court suspended a judge for 3 months without pay for failing to decide a divorce case for more than a year after the trial, failing to make a decision on an ex parte motion to compel the return of a child, and failing to respond to letters from the presiding judge expressing concern about the timeliness of decisions; the Court also assessed the judge $10,118.67 in costs and ordered the judge to attend the course on decision making at the National Judicial College. In the Matter of Hagar (North Dakota Supreme Court March 30, 2017).  The Court had censured the same judge in 2012 for a pattern of delay involving 12 cases and had suspended him for 1 month without pay in 2014 for failing to issue a decision in a divorce case until nearly 10 months after the trial.
  • In a de novo review, the Wyoming Supreme Court censured a judge for her refusal to perform same-sex marriages and ordered that she either perform no marriage ceremonies or that she perform marriage ceremonies regardless of the couple’s sexual orientation. Inquiry Concerning Neely (Wyoming Supreme Court March 7, 2017).

Recent cases

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for gathering signatures for 5 nominating petitions for the constable of her judicial precinct. Felix, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct February 6, 2017).
  • The Florida Supreme Court suspended a judge for 6 months without pay and publicly reprimanded him for (1) while a candidate, (a) falsely stating in a televised debate that he had never been accused of a conflict of interest and failing to correct that statement during the debate or afterwards and (b) stating at a judicial forum that he was a registered Republican and that his former affiliation with the Democratic Party was an error; and (2) while an attorney, (a) failing to advise opposing counsel that he was representing the judge presiding in their case in an unrelated case, (b) failing to advise 3 clients of the risks and advantages of common representation and to withdraw when conflicts became apparent, and (c) filing a bankruptcy petition and taking other actions on behalf of a client that were detrimental to other clients and incorrectly stating the status of his representation on filings in the bankruptcy court. Inquiry Concerning Decker (Florida Supreme Court March 2, 2017).
  • Agreeing with a statement of circumstances and conditional agreement for discipline, the Indiana Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a senior judge for his arrest and conviction for operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated. In the Matter of Page (Indiana Supreme Court February 20, 2017).
  • Based on an agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a former judge for engaging in a sexual relationship with a woman who was indicted in a felony criminal case over which he was presiding and having ex parte communications with her about her case. In re Dortch, Public reprimand (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission February 24, 2017).
  • The Louisiana Supreme Court ordered a judge to reimburse the district court $10,002.58 in out-of-pocket expenses paid to him under an unauthorized supplemental benefits program. In Derbigny (Louisiana Supreme Court January 20, 2017).
  • The Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline publicly reprimanded a judge and fined her $1,000 for signing an ex parte order as part of a Canadian divorce for an attorney she knew. In the Matter of Andress-Tobiasson, Findings of fact, conclusions of law, and imposition of discipline (Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline February 23, 2017).
  • Based on his consent and agreement not to serve in a judicial position, the Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline censured a former judge for holding 3 defendants in contempt of court without entering the necessary written order and ordering a public defender handcuffed and holding her in contempt. In the Matter of Hafen, Stipulation and order of consent (Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline February 27, 2017).
  • Based on the judge’s consent, the Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline publicly reprimanded a judge for falsely claiming 5 endorsements in a campaign ad. In the Matter of Smith, Stipulation and order of consent (Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline February 27, 2017).
  • The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals suspended a judge for 2 years without pay and ordered him to pay a $15,000 fine for a campaign flyer that falsely portrayed his opponent, the incumbent judge, partying at the White House with President Obama. In the Matter of Callaghan (West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals February 9, 2017).

Recent cases

  • Adopting a resolution jointly proposed by the Judicial Inquiry Commission and the judge based on an agreement and stipulation, the Alabama Court of the Judiciary suspended a judge for 11 months without pay for incarcerating offenders for non-payment of fines and costs without inquiring into their reasons for the non-payment in clear violation of state law, incarcerating offenders for months without a written order, and delegating judicial authority to a private probation company. In the Matter of Hayes, Final judgment (Alabama Court of the Judiciary January 6, 2017).
  • Based on the judge’s resignation and agreement, the Arkansas Judicial Discipline and Disabilities Commission removed a judge from office for performing probable cause determinations for cases involving friends or former clients following ex parte communications, lowering their bail, and releasing them on their own recognizance. Parker, Letter of removal from office (Arkansas Judicial Discipline and Disabilities Commission December 31, 2016).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a judge for telling 2 young girls she would send them to foster care if they did not go on vacation with their father and making other threats after an ex parte discussion with the father’s attorney. In re Matter of Embry (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission December 27, 2016).
  • Based on the judge’s agreement, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a judge for (1) requiring couples with children to participate in special hearings to determine whether their marriage was irretrievably broken but not requiring such hearings for couples who do not have children and (2) providing third parties with facts about cases that were not part of the public record to assist the third parties with their independent research and teaching duties. In re Philpot, Public reprimand (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission January 6, 2017).
  • Based on the findings and recommendation of the Commission on Retirement, Removal and Discipline, the Missouri Supreme Court suspended a judge for 6 months without pay for deliberately postponing the appointment of counsel for indigent defendants in probation violation cases until after the time limit for disqualification to prevent the public defender from disqualifying her and threatening to bring bar complaints against any public defender who entered an appearance before an appointment. In re Mennemeyer (Missouri Supreme Court January 3, 2017).
  • Accepting a stipulation and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a non-lawyer judge for making improper public comments on her Facebook account about a matter pending in another court and failing to delete public comments about the matter made by her court clerk. In the Matter of Whitmarsh, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 28, 2016).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct admonished a non-lawyer judge for circulating a designating petition for another candidate for elective office and improperly attesting to the signatures on 2 other designating petitions. In the Matter of Rumenapp, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 30, 2016).
  • Accepting the recommendation of the Judicial Standards Commission based on stipulations, the North Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for (1) failing to report income from extra-judicial sources and (2) presiding over a court session in which criminal charges for which he was the complaining witness were on the calendar and agreeing to dismiss the charges after the defendant paid him $3,000 cash in his chambers as restitution. In re Mack (North Carolina Supreme Court December 20, 2016).
  • Accepting the sanction recommended by the Board of Professional Conduct based on stipulations of fact and misconduct, the Ohio Supreme Court suspended a judge for 1 year for contacting a landlord on behalf of a tenant; the Court stayed the suspension on the condition that the judge commit no further misconduct. Disciplinary Counsel v. Elum (Ohio Supreme Court December 21, 2016).
  • The Utah Supreme Court approved implementation of the Judicial Conduct Commission’s order of reprimand, based on a stipulation, of a judge for serving as president of the OCA-Asian Pacific American Advocates. In re Kwan, Order (Utah Supreme Court November 4, 2016) .

Recent cases

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to disqualify himself from a case a family member filed against the school board, engaging in an ex parte communication with a party’s representative, and making public statements at a school board meeting about the case. Yellowhorse, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct November 14, 2016).
  • Pursuant to an agreement, the Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission sent a letter of informal adjustment to a judge for her delayed ruling in 1 matter. McGowan, Letter of informal adjustment (Arkansas Judicial Discipline & Disability Commission November 18, 2016).
  • Based on the commissioner’s resignation and agreement never to serve in judicial office, the California Commission on Judicial Performance dismissed a notice of formal proceedings filed against a former commissioner; the notice had alleged that the commissioner had threatened to take actions that exceeded his authority; made statements that suggested prejudgment or bias and gave litigants the impression that they could not receive a fair trial before a neutral arbiter in his department; in 2 cases in which a misdemeanor was charged, adjudicated the case without obtaining a stipulation from the defendant permitting him to do so and accepted a plea of guilty or no contest without informing the defendant that the charge was a misdemeanor and without informing the defendant of, or receiving the defendant’s explicit waiver of, the right to counsel, the privilege against compulsory self-incrimination, the right to trial by jury, and the right to confrontation; in 2 cases, accepted pleas of guilty without informing the defendants of the charges; failed to properly arraign the defendants in 4 cases; during his traffic calendar, had a practice of telling defendants that he did not want to hear any arguments about the amount of the fine, including their ability to pay, and refused to exercise his discretion to depart from the uniform bail and penalty schedule in sentencing; had a pattern of violating his duty to be patient, dignified, and courteous to litigants and their witnesses; if the uniform bail and penalty schedule called for a fine of $1,000 or more, had a practice of denying community service and requiring the defendant to pay the fine, regardless of the defendant’s ability to pay; if a defendant had posted bail to have a trial, had a practice of denying community service and requiring the defendant to pay the fine, regardless of the defendant’s ability to pay; after an earthquake was felt in his courtroom, made comments of a sexual nature to court staff; and referred to his courtroom clerk, who is Caucasian, as an “honorary black girl” and as “white girl” in the courtroom and in her presence. Inquiry Concerning Culver, Stipulated disposition of pend formal proceedings (California Commission on Judicial Performance December 20, 2016).
  • Approving the Judicial Qualifications Commission’s findings and recommendations, the Florida Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for sending an ex parte e-mail to the public defenders office; failing to seek a recusal or transfer when his division was effectively frozen during an appeal of his refusal to recuse based on the ex parte e-mail; and making impertinent and belittling remarks in open court about the appeal; the Court also ordered that the judge send a letter of apology, continue judicial mentoring for 3 years, complete a mental health program, and pay the costs of the disciplinary proceedings. Inquiry re Contini (Florida Supreme Court December 1, 2016).
  • Based on the decision of the Disciplinary Review Board, which was based on stipulated facts, the New Jersey Supreme Court suspended the law license of a former judge who had presented 4 tickets he and family members had received to other judges for favorable treatment. In the Matter of Sison, Order (New Jersey Supreme Court November 17, 2016).
  • Adopting the sanction recommended by the Board on Professional Conduct, the Ohio Supreme Court suspended an unsuccessful judicial candidate from the practice of law for 1 year for 2 campaign advertisements that contained patently false statements about his opponent; the Court stayed the final 6 months of the suspension on the conditions that he commit no further misconduct and attend a 6-hour CLE course regarding judicial campaigns. Disciplinary Counsel v. Tamburrino (Ohio Supreme Court December 7, 2016).
  • The Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline removed a former judge based on his no-contest plea to 2 state charges of official oppression for taking advantage of his official capacity by demanding that an adult female model lingerie at her residence in exchange for vacating her fines and costs and an unwanted sexual contact with another woman. In re Joy, Opinion (October 7, 2016), Order (November 29, 2016).
  • The Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline removed a judge from office for engaging in repeated ex parte communications with another judge about 3 cases and assuring the other judge that she would take the actions he wanted in those cases. In re Segal, Opinion and order (September 23, 2016), Opinion and order (Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline December 16, 2016).
  • The Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline removed a judge from office for knowingly accepting the offer of another judge to have ex parte contacts to influence a third judge’s decision in a case involving the respondent-judge’s sons. In re Roca, Opinion and order (October 20, 2016), Opinion and order (Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline December 16, 2016).

    Based on an agreement for discipline by consent, the South Carolina Supreme Court suspended a judge for 6 months without pay for Facebook posts about a case, political matters, and a fund-raiser for a local church. In the Matter of Johns (South Carolina Supreme Court November 16, 2016).

Recent cases

  • Pursuant to an agreed disposition, the Massachusetts Commission on Judicial Conduct resolved a complaint that a judge made insensitive racial comments to another judge in the judges’ lobby of the court with his retirement and agreement not to seek appointment as a recall justice. Creedon, Press release (Massachusetts Commission on Judicial Conduct October 17, 2016).
  • Agreeing with the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Performance, the Mississippi Supreme Court removed a former judge for physically assaulting a mentally disabled African-American male and directing racial slurs at him at a flea market; the Court also ordered that the judge pay a fine of $1,000 and costs of $5,918.46. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Weisenberger (Mississippi Supreme Court October 13, 2016).
  • Reviewing a determination of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, the New York Court of Appeals removed a judge from office for threatening at various times to hold the chief court clerk, case manager, police officers, mayor, village attorney, his co-judge, and others in contempt or have them arrested; being rude and discourteous to court employees and village officials and employees; and permitting a candidate for county executive to quote him in a campaign press release. In the Matter of Simon (New York Court of Appeals October 20, 2016).
  • Based on agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct admonished a judge for, on 3 occasions, asserting the prestige of judicial office while attempting to enter a county-owned building in possession of a firearm, in violation of a local law. In the Matter of Moskos, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 3, 2016).
  • Accepting an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct admonished a judge for threatening to hold an assistant district attorney in contempt, to declare a mistrial with prejudice and to impose sanctions on the district attorney’s office if a defendant was arrested for threatening a witness before the trial concluded, and yelling and acting discourteously toward the assistant district attorney. In the Matter of Gary, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 3, 2016).
  • The Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline removed a former judge from office based on his guilty plea in federal court to 2 counts of lying to a federal agent. In re O’Neill, Opinion and order (Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline October 27, 2016).
  • The Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline reprimanded and censured a former judge based on his guilty plea to mail fraud in federal court for mailing a ticket to an administrator of the Philadelphia Traffic Court, identifying the ticket as belonging to the son of a court clerk, and subsequently leaving a message on the administrator’s answering machine. In re Miller, Sanction opinion (Pennsylvania Court of Judicial Discipline September 23, 2016).
  • Pursuant to an agreement, the Tennessee Board on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for intervening on behalf of an acquaintance with a jailer and another judge. Re Anderson (Tennessee Board on Judicial Conduct October 24, 2016).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct reprimanded a judge for her handling of conflicting judgments in 2 eviction cases, her award of damages to a tenant in an eviction case, and Facebook posts that promoted the financial interests of a relative and a former judge. Public Reprimand of Uresti and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 11, 2016).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct warned a judge who had pled guilty to driving while intoxicated. Public Warning of Jeanes (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 20, 2016).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Judicial Hearing Board based on stipulations and a joint recommendation, the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals censured a former judicial candidate, ordered him to pay costs, and permanently enjoined him from seeking judicial office for personally soliciting campaign contributions on his personal and campaign Facebook pages, establishing a bank account so that he could personally accept campaign contributions, and making inappropriate comments while a candidate. In the Matter of Kohout, Order (West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals October 7, 2015).