Throwback Thursday

5 year ago this month:

  • Based on a recommendation and stipulated resolution, the Arizona Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for his failure to be patient, dignified, and courteous in 2 settlement conferences. Inquiry Concerning Cornelio, Order (Arizona Supreme Court April 24, 2013).
  • Accepting a settlement agreement, the Indiana Supreme Court permanently banned a senior judge from judicial service and suspended her from the practice of law for 1 year for an improper romantic relationship with a defendant while serving as his public defender; all but 45 days of the suspension was stayed subject to 2 years’ probation. In the Matter of Traylor-Wolff, Order (Indiana Supreme Court April 9, 2013).
  • Based on a stipulation and the judge’s consent, the New Hampshire Judicial Conduct Committee publicly reprimanded a judge for presiding over 2 arraignments in cases in which the victim was his brother-in-law without disclosing the relationship. Lyons, Reprimand (New Hampshire Judicial Conduct Committee April 16, 2013).
  • Accepting the determination of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, the New York Court of Appeals removed a former judge for sexual contact with a 5-year-old girl in 1972. In the Matter of Hedges, 988 N.E.2d 509 (New York 2013).
  • Accepting an agreement for discipline by consent, the South Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge for his conduct in 5 cases. In the Matter of Bryngelson, 742 S.E.2d 392 (South Carolina 2013).
  • Pursuant to an agreement, the Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for his intemperate, argumentative, and disruptive conduct during a deposition, which was contrary to a 2009 deferred discipline agreement in which he had agreed to cease and desist from injudicious treatment directed at a particular law firm.  Wilson (Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct April 11, 2013).
  • Pursuant to an agreement, the Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for granting a petition to modify a permanent parenting plan following an ex parte hearing. Wilson (Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct April 5, 2013).
  • Pursuant to an agreement, the Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for (1) commenting that he believed an attorney must be having a sexual relationship with another attorney, which the other attorneys heard; and (2) approaching the spouse of a court employee who had taken a leave of absence and whom the judge perceived had personal issues with him, and, in the presence of others who worked with the spouse, using inappropriate language to abrasively inquire about the court employee’s potential problem. McKenzie (Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct April 11, 2013).

 

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s