Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • Based on the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Conduct, the Arizona Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for taking the questions and the answer key for a written assessment from her mentor’s materials during new judge orientation; the Court also ordered the judge to take judicial ethics courses and to pay the costs and attorney’s fees for the formal hearing.  In the Matter of Aboud, Order (Arizona Supreme Court December 4, 2017).
  • The Illinois Courts Commission ordered the retirement of a judge it found mentally unable to perform her duties.  In re Turner, Order (Illinois Courts Commission December 1, 2017).
  • In lieu of formal disciplinary proceedings and based on the judge’s consent, the Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications publicly admonished a judge for injudicious behavior involving his estranged wife that prompted law enforcement investigations.  Public Admonition of Day (Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications December 29, 2017).
  • The Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission publicly reprimanded a former judge for entering a general order declaring that “under no circumstance” would the adoption of a child by a homosexual be in the child’s best interest.  In re the Matter of Nance, Findings of fact, conclusions of law, and final order (Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission December 19, 2017).
  • Granting a petition to accept a stipulation and consent to discipline, the New Mexico Supreme Court suspended a judge for 3 weeks without pay and publicly censured him for ex parte communications in numerous cases, misusing the contempt power, failing to cooperate with supervisory personnel from the administrative office of the courts, allowing his judicial decisions and conduct to be influenced by public opinion, fear of criticism, and/or political interests, and other misconduct; his suspension was deferred on condition he complete a supervised probation and formal mentorship for the remainder of his term and complete 2 National Judicial College webcast courses.  In the Matter of Walton, Order (New Mexico Supreme Court December 18, 2017).
  • Accepting an agreed statement of facts and recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge for undermining the right to counsel in 3 cases, conveying an appearance of bias, eliciting incriminatory responses from a defendant at arraignment, making discourteous and threatening comments, destroying court records without authorization, and holding extra-judicial positions (court clerk and fire police officer) that were incompatible with judicial office.  In the Matter of Kline, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 26, 2017).
  • Agreeing with the findings and recommendation of a panel of the Board of Professional Conduct based on a stipulation, the Ohio Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a magistrate for asserting her status in an attempt to avoid arrest during a traffic stop.  Disciplinary Counsel v. Williams, 92 N.E.3d 859 (Ohio 2017).
  • The Ohio Supreme Court indefinitely suspended a former judge from the practice of law for his conviction, based on a guilty plea, to 1 count of attempted felonious assault and 1 count of domestic violence for conduct while he was a judge.  State Bar Association v. Mason, 94 N.E.3d 556 (Ohio 2017).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for setting a $4 billion bond for a murder suspect and magistrating her own son; the Commission also ordered that the judge receive 2 hours of instruction on magistration with a mentor.  Public Reprimand of Brown and Order of Additional Education (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 19, 2017).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for stating during a hearing, “we don’t know whether he’s some white guy like me making a threat or somebody who’s, you know, more likely to be a gangster.”  In re North, Stipulation, agreement, and order of admonishment (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 8, 2017).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for driving under the influence.  In re Dingledy, Stipulation, agreement, and order of reprimand (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct December 8, 2017).

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s