Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • Based on a stipulated resolution and recommendation, the Arizona Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for repeatedly engaging in ex parte communications and conducting his own factual investigation in a case.  Inquiry Concerning Andress, Order (Arizona Supreme Court October 26, 2010).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for causing a collision while driving his vehicle under the influence of alcohol.  Public Admonishment of Doyle (California Commission on Judicial Performance October 21, 2010).
  • The Minnesota Board on Judicial Standards publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to decide 2 cases within 90 days as required by statute; 1 case was decided 119 days after submission; the second 138 days after submission.  Press release (Johnson) (Minnesota Board on Judicial Standards October 13, 2010).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge for failing to disqualify himself from cases involving his nephews, his employers’ sons, and his co-justice.  In the Matter of Menard, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 13, 2010).
  • Accepting an agreed statement of facts, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for telling the town board that, unless his salary was increased, he would not preside over the court dates scheduled by his retired co-justice and would dismiss the cases scheduled on the next such date.  In the Matter of Peters, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 6, 2010).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge who operated a motor vehicle after consuming a significant quantity of alcohol and was convicted of driving while intoxicated.  In the Matter of Martineck, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 12, 2010).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a non-lawyer judge for (1) failing to appear for sentencing on a dog-running-at-large violation and failing for 7 months to pay the fine imposed; (2) serving simultaneously as judge and court clerk of the same court; and (3) participating in fund-raising on behalf of her and her son’s sports teams.  In the Matter of Post, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 12, 2010).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts, the New York State Commission on Judicial Commission publicly admonished a non-lawyer judge for failing to disqualify himself from a harassment case when he was acquainted with the defendant and the alleged victim and had personal knowledge of the underlying facts.  In the Matter of Trickler, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 7, 2010).
  • Accepting an agreed statement of facts, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for intervening in an impending proceeding involving his business tenant and a long-time acquaintance and promoting a financial settlement rather than disqualify himself from the case.  In the Matter of Dugan, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 6, 2010).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct removed a former judge for (1) violating the due process rights of defendants in 6 support cases and 1 order of protection case by failing, inter alia, to advise them of the right to counsel and to afford an opportunity to be heard, notwithstanding a letter of dismissal and caution he had received and (2) making offensive remarks of a sexual nature to and about a litigant.  In the Matter of Abramson, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 26, 2010).
  • The Ohio Supreme Court suspended a judge from the practice of law for 6 months for, in response to reports that an elderly witness could not be found, finding that the defendant had engaged in obstruction of justice and misusing the Amber Alert system to attract media attention; the Court stayed the suspension on the condition that the judge commit no misconduct for 6 months.  Disciplinary Counsel v. Gaul, 936 N.E.2d 28 (Ohio 2010).
  • Adopting the findings of fact and misconduct and the recommended of the Board of Commissioners on Grievance and Discipline based on the parties’ consent-to-discipline agreement, the Ohio Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for using marijuana.  Disciplinary Counsel v. Bowling, 937 N.E.2d 95 (Ohio 2010).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly warned a judge following his guilty plea to a charge of criminal mischief arising out of an incident in which he allegedly “keyed” his neighbor’s car.  Public Warning of Densen (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 14, 2010).

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