Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge for making numerous sarcastic and improper remarks in a case.  Gaumont, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct April 12, 2010).
  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a judge for (1) failing to require a potential juror to remove a tinfoil hat; (2) being absent from court and causing the absence of the court clerk; (3) dismissing cases without authority; (4) taking action in 2 cases from which he was disqualified; (5) delays; and (6) a discourteous comment regarding the district attorney.  In the Matter Concerning Edwards, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance April 12, 2010).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Performance, the Mississippi Supreme Court suspended a judge for 6 months without pay and publicly reprimanded him for, in a tenant-removal action, trying to negotiate the sale of the property at issue instead of hearing evidence and failing to disqualify himself even though he had known one of the parties her whole life, had spoken with her father about the property, and had done landscaping work on the property.  Commission on Judicial Performance v. Hartzog, 32 So. 3d 1188 (Mississippi 2010).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for failing to render timely decisions in 26 cases over more than 3 and 1/2 years.  In the Matter of Gilpatric, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct April 27, 2010).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge for (1) apparently out of personal animus, threatening to impose bail for routine traffic charges against a defendant and allowing the defendant half the time he customarily gave for paying a fine and, after learning that the defendant had complained to the Commission, refusing to give him an extension of time to pay the fine and (2) threatening a defendant and his father out of pique after being advised by the court clerk, who was his wife, that the defendant’s father had been “very rude” when he called to request an extension for paying a fine.  In re Tripp, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct April 20, 2010).
  • Based on the recommendation of the Judicial Standards Commission, the North Carolina Supreme Court removed a former judge from office for remaining on the board of directors of a corporation and making intentional misrepresentations during the Commission investigation.  In re Belk, 691 S.E.2d 685 (North Carolina 2010).
  • Accepting an agreement for discipline by consent, the South Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for finding a defendant guilty in absentia.  In the Matter of Holmes, 692 S.E.2d 905 (South Carolina 2010).

 

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