Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • Accepting the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Conduct, the Alaska Supreme Court suspended a judge for 45 days without pay for failing to timely decide 3 matters and signing 16 pay affidavits when matters had been pending for more than 6 months.  In re Estelle, 336 P.3d 692 (Alaska 2014).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Conduct, the Arizona Supreme Court removed a judge and barred him from judicial office for failing to effectively oversee court administration, inefficient and ineffective calendar and court management, prohibiting the training of clerk/staff, creating a hostile work environment, poor demeanor, lack of professionalism and decorum, questionable judgment, and racially discriminatory or offensive remarks.  Inquiry Concerning Sulley, Order (Arizona Supreme Court September 23, 2014).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Arkansas Commission on Judicial Discipline and Disability issued a letter of informal adjustment to a judge for his $525 contribution to the campaign of a candidate for the State House of Representatives.  Letter of Informal Adjustment to Bourne (Arkansas Commission on Judicial Discipline and Disability September 19, 2014).
  • Based on a “report not contested” filed by the Judicial Discipline and Disability Commission, the Arkansas Supreme Court removed a judge from office for (1) on a public, on-line fan-site, posting comments regarding the closed adoption of a famous actress; making inappropriate statements about official duties, pending cases, and independent investigations; and making inappropriate gender, race, and sexually related statements; (2) spoliation of evidence; and (3) involvement in a hot check case in which he was the victim.  Judicial Discipline and Disability Commission v. Maggio, 440 S.W.3d 333 (Arkansas 2014).
  • Based on a stipulation for discipline by consent, the California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly censured a judge for (1) engaging in sexual activity in his chambers on multiple occasions with 2 women; (2) initiating contact with the district attorney’s office about the employment application of one of the women, asking questions about the interview and hiring processes, and expressing irritation that his recommendation had not resulted in her hiring; (3) after disqualifying himself from cases in which the second women appeared, re-assigning her cases to other judges; and (4) failing to disqualify himself from a case in which a close friend was an attorney.  In the Matter Concerning Steiner, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance September 2, 2014).
  • Based on a stipulation for discipline by consent, the California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly censured a judge for engaging in sexual intercourse in the courthouse with a courtroom clerk, exchanging communications of a sexual nature with her during court proceedings, and misleading court administration and his superior judicial officers in an effort to prevent the clerk’s reassignment.  In the Matter Concerning Woodward, Decision and order (California Commission on Judicial Performance September 2, 2014).
  • Based on the application of the Commission on Judicial Qualifications, the Iowa Supreme Court suspended a judge for 30 days without pay for appearing at the courthouse in an intoxicated state and unable to perform scheduled judicial duties.  In the Matter of Dean, 855 N.W.2d 186 (Iowa 2014).
  • Accepting the recommendation of the Judicial Tenure Commission based on a settlement agreement, the Michigan Supreme Court publicly censured a judge and suspended her for 30 days for taking the bench at 11 a.m. on 5 days on which matters were scheduled for 9, 9:30, or 10.  In re Gibson, 852 N.W.2d 891 (Michigan 2014).
  • Based on a stipulation, the Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline publicly reprimanded a judge for being or appearing to be intoxicated while performing his duties and related misconduct; the judge agreed to complete a course at the National Judicial Conduct on co-occurring disorders, to continue counseling, and to attend Alcohol Anonymous at least once a week.  In the Matter of Fletcher, Stipulation and order (Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline September 27, 2014).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a former judge for (1) failing to timely sign orders, renditions, and findings of fact in 4 divorce cases and (2) dismissing for want of prosecution 600 divorce cases without notice or a hearing, including active cases awaiting trial or the judge’s signature on final orders and cases from which she had already been recused.  Public Reprimand of Pratt (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct September 4, 2014).

 

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