Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge who became angry with a litigant, telling her to change her attitude, stating, “I am the judge,” and warning her that she would not be able to present her evidence if her attitude did not change. Hyatt, Amended Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct June 24, 2009).
  • Granting the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Conduct based on a stipulation and the judge’s agreement to resign, the Arizona Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for failing to issue decisions within 60 days in 25 cases over 3 years, submitting 11 inaccurate salary certifications, and failing to institute a comprehensive case-tracking system. Inquiry Concerning Hinson, Judgment and Order (Arizona Supreme Court June 2009).
  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a justice of the peace for orally setting terms of visitation relating to a pending superior court case although she had been notified that the superior court case was pending. Amended Order Davis (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct June 24, 2009).
  • With the judge’s consent, the Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications publicly admonished a judge for (1) participating in an ex parte conversation with a defendant about her traffic infractions and assuming the role of the prosecutor by negotiating a resolution to the case and (2) employing his wife as court clerk. Public Admonition of Huizenga (Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications June 22, 2009).
  • Granting a joint motion, the Mississippi Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge and fined him $2,000 for, in a criminal case, engaging in ex parte communications with the victim, the defendant, and her mother; allowing the defendant’s mother to enter a plea for the defendant; failing to act with courtesy toward the defendant; writing a note to the defendant’s employer; and finding the defendant in contempt and ordering her to pay restitution based on a prior incomplete order. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Vess, 10 So. 3d 486 (Mississippi 2009).
  • The Mississippi Supreme Court suspended a former judge for 1 year without pay for disparaging remarks about Caucasian officials and their African-American appointees. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Osborne, 11 So. 3d 107 (Mississippi 2009).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Performance, the Mississippi Supreme Court removed a former judge for committing a minor to detention without a hearing and taking other action after recusing himself from the case. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Osborne, 16 So. 3d 16 (Mississippi 2009).
  • Adopting the findings and recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, the New Jersey Supreme Court permanently disqualified a former judge from holding judicial office for (1) twice presiding while intoxicated; (2) disorderly conduct in a bar and referring to his judicial status; (3) abusing the contempt power in several matters and intemperate conduct; (4) consulting with a municipal entity; (5) giving “discounts” in vehicle cases based on the defendants’ status as a high school student; and (6) routinely sanctioning latecomers. In the Matter of Sasso, Order (New Jersey Supreme Court June 2, 2009).
  • Adopting the findings and recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, which the judge accepted, the New Jersey Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for driving while intoxicated and obstructive conduct at the police headquarters after his arrest. In the Matter of Tourison, Order (New Jersey Supreme Court June 2, 2009).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for failing to render decisions in a timely manner in 47 cases. In the Matter of Gilpatric, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct June 5, 2009).
  • Based on an agreed statement of fact and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for, over a 6-year period, failing to render timely decisions in 29 cases and failing to report 10 of the delayed cases as required to court administrators. In the Matter of Turner, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct June 30, 2009).
  • The South Carolina Supreme Court suspended a judge for altering a court order and a letter from the Commission on Continuing Legal Education and Specialization retroactive to his interim suspension. In the Matter of Sullivan, 679 S.E.2d 525 (South Carolina 2009).

 

 

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