Throwback Thursday

5 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a court commissioner for hearing testimony in a child support case from the mother at a hearing when the father was not present because he had a medical emergency, ordering the father to pay a purge amount by a specified date, issuing an arrest warrant for the father when he failed to pay the purge amount, and providing specious and incomplete responses during the Commission investigation. Morton, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct February 3, 2014).
  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a former court commissioner for operating a vehicle while under the influence. Madden, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct February 12, 2014).
  • Based on a stipulated resolution in which the judge agreed to resign, the Colorado Supreme Court publicly censured a judge for inappropriate jokes and comments in the course of his duties and ex parte communications. In the Matter of Rand, 332 P.3d 115 (Colorado 2014).
  • Adopting the findings and recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, which were accepted by the judge and based on stipulations, the New Jersey Supreme Court publicly admonished a judge for using his judicial stationery when communicating with school officials in an effort to secure funding for a summer camp for the son of the woman with whom he was in a relationship. In the Matter of Isabella (New Jersey Supreme Court February 19, 2014).  The Court’s order does not describe the judge’s misconduct; this summary is based on the Committee’s presentment.
  • Adopting the findings of fact of the Judicial Conduct Commission, the North Dakota Supreme Court suspended a judge for 1 month without pay for failing to diligently and promptly decide judicial matters assigned to him. In the Matter of Hagar, 842 N.W.2d 873 (North Dakota 2014).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for encouraging defendants at an arraignment to enter a guilty plea that afternoon, promising a specific outcome, and failing to require written plea forms when 12 defendants accepted her offer. In re Seitz, Stipulation, Agreement, and Order (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct February 24, 2014).

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