Throwback Thursday  

10 years ago this month:

  • Pursuant to a stipulation, the California Commission on Judicial Performance publicly admonished a former judge for failing to be patient, dignified, and courteous in 5 cases. In the Matter of Bryant, Decision and Order (California Commission on Judicial Performance October 27, 2008).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Commission on Judicial Performance based on an agreed statement of facts and proposed recommendation, the Mississippi Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former part-time judge for representing a defendant after presiding over proceedings concerning the same defendant on the same criminal charges. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Pittman, 993 So. 2d 816 (Mississippi 2008).
  • The Mississippi Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge and fined her and levied costs of $7,782.06 for repeatedly entering unlawful orders resulting in a man’s incarceration. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Boland, 998 So.2d 380 (Mississippi 2008).
  • Accepting the determination of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, the New York Court of Appeals removed a judge from office for (1) presiding over cases in which his step-grandchildren were the defendants, (2) initiating an ex parte communication with the judge handling his step-grandson’s case, (3) arraigning a former co-worker’s son and changing a bail decision after an ex parte call from the defendant’s mother, and (4) asserting his judicial office after a car accident. In the Matter of LaBombard, 898 N.E.2d 14 (New York 2008).
  • Accepting the determination of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, the New York Court of Appeals removed a judge for violating the fundamental due process rights of litigants in 5 cases. In the Matter of Jung, 899 N.E.2d 925 (New York 2008).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge who, in the absence of counsel and with good cause to believe that the defendant was intoxicated and incapable of understanding and asserting his rights, accepted a guilty plea at arraignment and sentenced the 19-year-old defendant to 90 days in jail without making any significant inquiry into whether the defendant was capable of entering a plea or appreciated the disadvantages of waiving the right to the assistance of counsel. In the Matter of Dunlop, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 28, 2008).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge who presided over 2 cases in which his personal attorney appeared. In the Matter of Ambrecht, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 28, 2008).
  • The North Carolina Supreme Court removed a judge for (1) awarding spousal support in a domestic violence protective order case when none had been requested and no evidence had been presented, ordering the bailiff to search the husband’s wallet and turn his money over to the wife; (2) making statements that created the appearance of bias; and (3) during the investigation, making untruthful, deceptive, and inconsistent statements to a State Bureau of Investigation agent and attempting to influence the recollections of a deputy clerk and the plaintiff’s attorney; the Court also disqualified him from holding further judicial office in the state and declared him ineligible for retirement benefits. In re Badgett, 666 S.E.2d 743 (North Carolina 2008).
  • The South Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge for (1) referring to his judicial office in a dispute with a motorist and (2) his actions during a foreclosure action on his residence. In the Matter of Anderson, 668 S.E.2d 413 (South Carolina 2008).
  • Pursuant to the judge’s agreement, the Tennessee Court of the Judiciary publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to make findings of fact required by law in a juvenile proceeding and signing 2 orders in the case after recusing. Complaint against Rich (Tennessee Court of the Judiciary October 10, 2008).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a former judge for (1) allowing a grand jury he had appointed to be influenced by a friend and political supporter seeking indictments against political opponents based upon information that had been rejected by multiple independent investigative agencies and (2) requesting a court of inquiry to investigate a political opponent based on affidavits that were not credible and did not constitute probable cause. Public Reprimand of Davis (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 31, 2008).

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