Throwback Thursday

10  years ago this month:

  • The D.C. Commission on Judicial Disabilities and Tenure found that a judge violated the code of judicial conduct by ordering the detention of an attorney appearing before him; the judge accepted the Commission’s determination, recognized that his conduct was regrettable and violated the code, and undertook to avoid such conduct in the future and to conform to the code. Re Bayly, Determination and undertaking (D.C. Commission on Judicial Disabilities and Tenure March 12, 2008).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge for (1) bullying an attorney who had been sent by his firm to request an adjournment; (2) presiding over a matter without fully disclosing that one of the attorneys had recently represented his sister at his expense; (3) while an attorney was appearing before him in a case, offering to testify on the attorney’s behalf in a Grievance Committee proceeding if she would testify on his behalf in the Commission’s investigation; (4) denying the attorney’s legitimate request to make a record of her arguments on behalf on her client shortly after she denied his request that she testify on his behalf; and (5) granting an adjournment of nearly 3 months in an eviction proceeding for a punitive, retaliatory purpose. In the Matter of Hart, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 7, 2008).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a judge who, in a speeding case, granted special consideration to the defendant, who was the wife of a friend and former military colleague. In the Matter of Lew, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct March 26, 2008).
  • Based on the recommendation of the Judicial Standards Commission, the North Carolina Supreme Court suspended a judge without pay for 60 days and publicly censured him for (1) having a business relationship with an attorney and failing to disclose the relationship in or disqualify himself from matters involving the attorney; (2) attempting to coerce the district attorney into signing a remittal of disqualification and retaliating against the district attorney’s office after the district attorney refused to sign; and (3) being habitually rude and condescending to those appearing before him and demonstrating an arrogant, contemptuous demeanor while presiding over court. In re Badgett, 657 S.E.2d 346 (North Carolina 2008).

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