Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • The Louisiana Supreme Court suspended a judge for 15 days without pay for (1) failing to give a judgment debtor proper notice of a hearing, finding the judgment debtor in contempt of court without conducting a hearing or allowing the judgment debtor to be heard, and issuing an arrest warrant without signing a judgment of contempt; and (2) permitting her constable to use her judicial authority to collect worthless checks on behalf of local merchants. In re Frederic-Braud, 973 So. 2d 712 (Louisiana 2008).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and recommendation, the Mississippi Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for, in a case in which he had decided not to be involved, insisting that another judge talk with him before signing an arrest warrant, becoming angry when the other judge refused, and instructing a court clerk not to issue the warrant. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Thompson, 972 So. 2d 582 (Mississippi 2008).
  • The Mississippi Supreme Court suspended a judge for 180 days without pay for his actions in response to the repossession of an automobile jointly owned by his wife and mother-in-law. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Osborne, 977 So.2d 314 (Mississippi 2008).
  • Based on an agreement for discipline by consent, the South Carolina Supreme Court suspended a magistrate for 90 days without pay for failing to ensure that deposits were made and bank accounts were reconciled monthly. In the Matter of Lynah, 656 S.E.2d 344 (South Carolina 2008).

 

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