Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • The California Commission on Judicial Performance removed a judge for (1) failing to dispose of matters promptly and executing false salary affidavits; (2) becoming embroiled in 3 criminal cases; and (3) failing to respond to a letter from the Commission. Inquiry Concerning Spitzer, Decision and Order (California Commission on Judicial Performance October 2, 2007).
  • The Minnesota Board on Judicial Standards publicly reprimanded a judge for failing to decide a case within the 90 days permitted by law. Public Reprimand of Roue (Minnesota Board on Judicial Standards October 4, 2007).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts, the Mississippi Supreme Court suspended a judge for 30 days without pay and publicly reprimanded him for ex parte communications with and giving legal advice to a litigant. Commission on Judicial Performance v. Fowlkes, 967 So.2d 12 (Mississippi 2007).
  • Granting a stipulated petition for discipline, the New Mexico Supreme Court suspended a judge for 2 weeks without pay for (1) living in a housing authority home for 20 months without paying rent and (2) dismissing 3 traffic citations issued to the director of the housing authority. In the Matter of Gomez (New Mexico Supreme Court October 25, 2007).
  • Granting a petition filed by the Commission on Judicial Standards based on stipulated findings of fact, the New Mexico Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for endorsing a mayor for re-election and authorizing the use of his name in an endorsement that was published in the newspaper. Inquiry Concerning Vincent, 172 P.3d 605 (New Mexico 2007).
  • Adopting the findings of fact, conclusions of law, and recommendation of the Board of Commissioners on Grievances and Discipline, the Ohio Supreme Court suspended a former judge from the practice of law for 2 years for her conduct in 2 civil protection order cases, 2 divorce cases, and 1 case involving a complaint that a child was abused and neglected; the Court stayed 12 months of the suspension on condition that the former judge commit no further violations. Disciplinary Counsel v. Squire, 876 N.E.2d 933 (Ohio 2007).
  • Adopting the findings and recommendation of the Board of Commissioners on Grievances and Discipline, the Ohio Supreme Court suspended a judge’s license to practice law for 18 months, with 6 months stayed with conditions, for (1) jailing a gallery spectator for contempt without cause; (2) presiding over a defendant’s plea and sentencing even though he had accompanied the police officer after signing a search warrant for the defendant’s apartment; (3) attempting to coerce plea agreements in 2 criminal cases; (4) insisting that a domestic violence victim’s facial injuries be photographed; (5) calling 911 to have a police officer sent to his chambers to transport a prisoner to court; (6) telephoning a defendant’s alleged drug dealer in open court; and (7) repeatedly mistreating defendants and other participants in court proceedings. Disciplinary Counsel v. Parker, 876 N.E.2d 556 (Ohio 2007).
  • Based on a stipulation and agreement, the Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct admonished a judge for (1) stating, “I would if you pulled it out but you can’t find it,” in response to a vulgar statement by a defendant and (2) referring to the ethnicity of 2 defendants while presiding over mental health court. In the Matter of Chow, Stipulation, Agreement, and Order (Washington State Commission on Judicial Conduct October 24, 2007).

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