Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month:

  • The Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly reprimanded a judge who became irritable and impatient with an attorney and, when the attorney tried to make a record, said, “I don’t care for the record, Mr. Jones. You say one more word and you’re in contempt.”  Andress, Order (Arizona Commission on Judicial Conduct July 11, 2007).
  • With the judge’s agreement, the D.C. Commission on Judicial Disabilities and Tenure determined that a judge made comments about cultural issues prior to sentencing in a sexual abuse case that created an appearance of bias and compromised the integrity of the judicial process. Re Mitchell-Rankin, Determination and Undertaking (D.C. Commission on Judicial Disabilities and Tenure July 9, 2007).
  • Adopting the recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct to which the justice did not object, the New Jersey Supreme Court publicly censured a supreme court justice for communications with the police, prosecutors, and judges that created an unacceptable risk that his judicial office could influence the handling of a matter relating to his son. In the Matter of Rivera-Soto, 927 A.2d 112 (New Jersey 2007).
  • Granting a petition filed by the Commission on Judicial Standards based on stipulated findings of fact, the New Mexico Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a judge for endorsing a mayor for re-election and authorizing the use of his name in an endorsement that was published in the local newspaper. Inquiry Concerning Vincent, 172 P.3d 605 (New Mexico 2007).
  • Upholding the determination of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, the New York Court of Appeals removed a judge for (1) dismissing several code violation cases based on ex parte communications without providing the prosecution with notice or an opportunity to be heard and (2) testifying falsely about her actions and altering her court calendar to support her false testimony. In the Matter of Marshall, 872 N.E.2d 247 (New York July 2007).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge who failed for over 6 years to adequately supervise his court clerks and to discharge his administrative duties diligently, resulting in missing court monies. In the Matter of Cavotta, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct July 19, 2007).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly censured a non-lawyer judge whose handling of 3 small claims matters was fraught with errors and violated well-established statutory and ethical mandates. In the Matter of Edwards, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct July 19, 2007).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct removed a non-lawyer judge who, in a property dispute involving a relative, had abused his judicial authority, presided over the matter notwithstanding his bias against the defendants, used his judicial power to benefit his relative’s interests, and used the term “jewing” while berating the defendants. In the Matter of Ellis, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct July 24, 2007).
  • The Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct publicly admonished a judge for (1) finding a defendant guilty in absentia; (2) in a second case, failing to provide adequate notice or an opportunity to respond before finding a defendant in contempt and issuing orders and fines that he had no authority to enforce; and (3) issuing a subpoena to compel another judge to appear before him. Public Admonition of Wall (Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct July 13, 2007).
  • Accepting an agreement for discipline by consent, the South Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former judge following his guilty plea to common law misconduct in office. In the Matter of Stephens, 650 S.E.2d 849 (South Carolina 2007).

 

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