Throwback Thursday

25 years ago this month

  • The Mississippi Supreme Court privately reprimanded a justice court judge who had engaged in ticket-fixing. Judicial Performance Commission v. A Justice Court Judge, 580 So. 2d 1259 (Mississippi 1991).
  • The New Jersey Supreme Court censured a judge who had pled guilty to driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor, leaving the scene of an accident, and driving in a careless manner. In the Matter of Connor, 589 A.2d 1347 (New Jersey 1991).
  • Adopting the report and recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct, the New Jersey Supreme Court reprimanded a judge who had pled guilty to driving while under the influence of intoxicating liquor and failing to observe a traffic signal and who had been charged with using courtesy license plates on his automobile prior to receiving written authorization from the Division of Motor Vehicles. In the Matter of Lawson, 590 A.2d 1132 (New Jersey 1991).
  • Agreeing with the findings and recommendation of the Judicial Standards Commission, the North Carolina Supreme Court censured a judge who, during proceedings in open court in a criminal case, (1) had wrongfully ordered the detention of the defendant’s attorney (for 45 minutes) when the attorney refused in good faith, on ethical grounds, to give the judge a reason for his motion to withdraw or to make a recommendation concerning the defendant’s eligibility for a diversion program and (2) had informed the attorney that in the future he would accept no recommendations from him, would not grant him any continuances, would not appoint him to represent indigent defendants, and would require his clients to plead guilty or not guilty as charged. In re Bullock, 403 S.E.2d 264 (North Carolina 1991).
  • Agreeing with the findings and recommendation of the Judicial Standards Commission, the North Carolina Supreme Court censured a judge who (1) during proceedings in open court in an assault on a female case, told the 7-months pregnant victim that she would ruin her children’s lives if she did not reconcile with her estranged husband, referred to her support group as a one-sided, man-hating bunch of females and a pack of she-dogs, and polled the courtroom spectators as to how many had little spats during their marriages, and (2) routinely admitted in open court that he broke the law by driving 52 miles an hour in 45 mile-an-hour zones and 62 miles an hour in 55 mile-an-hour zones and counselled defendants that they should keep their speeding within those limits to avoid apprehension and conviction. In re Greene, 403 S.E.2d 257 (North Carolina 1991).
  • Accepting the recommendation of the Judicial Standards Commission, the North Carolina Supreme Court removed a former judge who had pled guilty to 3 felony charges after being arrested for possessing marijuana, cocaine, and drug paraphernalia. In re Sherrill, 403 S.E.2d 255 (North Carolina 1991).
  • Agreeing with the recommendation of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, a special court of review appointed by the Texas Supreme Court reprimanded a former judge who had had a shouting match with the owner of an appliance store and a store employee. In re Sheppard, 815 S.W.2d 917 (Texas Special Court of Review 1991).

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