Throwback Thursday

10 years ago this month

  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct removed a judge who had abandoned his judicial position to pursue other employment. In the Matter of Fiore, Determination (New York State Commission on Conduct August 17, 2005) (http://www.cjc.ny.gov/Determinations/all_decisions.htm).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct censured a part-time judge who had (1) entered into an agreement to sell property owned by the family of a youthful defendant whom he had recently sentenced to a conditional discharge in a highly publicized case and (2) entered into a brokerage agreement to sell a house 7 months after he had presided over a proceeding involving the property. In the Matter of Voetsch, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 17, 2005) (http://www.cjc.ny.gov/Determinations/all_decisions.htm).
  • The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct admonished a judge who, while visiting a store to discuss procedures in a bad check case involving the store, said that his daughter was looking for a job and picked up an application for her; later, he personally delivered the completed application to the store. In the Matter of Pastrick, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 17, 2005) (http://www.cjc.ny.gov/Determinations/all_decisions.htm).
  • Based on an agreed statement of fact and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct censured a non-lawyer judge who (1) telephoned the judge who was handling his wife’s traffic case, identified himself as a judge, and identified the defendant as his spouse and (2) requested special consideration for a long-time acquaintance. In the Matter of LaClair, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 31, 2005) (http://www.cjc.ny.gov/Determinations/all_decisions.htm).
  • Based on an agreed statement of facts and joint recommendation, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct censured a non-lawyer judge who, in numerous cases, dismissed or reduced the charges or granted an adjournment in contemplation of dismissal without notice to or the consent of the prosecution as required by law and after soliciting or receiving ex parte information. In the Matter of Cook, Determination (New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct August 31, 2005) (http://www.cjc.ny.gov/Determinations/all_decisions.htm).
  • Accepting an agreement for discipline by consent, the South Carolina Supreme Court publicly reprimanded a former magistrate who had been found guilty of loitering to engage in criminal activity, a misdemeanor. In the Matter of Rutland, 618 S.E.2d 897 (South Carolina 2005).

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